Review Of Uncle Sam's Thanksgiving Dinner Cartoon Essay

The American Gulliver and Chinese Lilliputians cartoon is definitely anti-immigration. I basically portray, the big man, “America” being held back by many Chinese workers who are demanding the same rights Americans have. The conservative cartoon makes the Chinese look terrible and demanding a lot, when they really just want the bare necessities. In the background, there are hundreds more pouring in. America is overwhelmed and cannot keep up. I think the cartoon is effective although it does not demonstrate the Chinese perspective. I would disagree with the cartoons viewpoint because even though we could be overwhelmed, these people want what we have, “better lives”. It is only fair for them to get what they deserve.

This cartoon shows many different types of people at Uncle Sam’s, having Thanksgiving dinner. At the table, there are Chinese, Jewish, White, and Black people. In the corners of the drawing, there are notes saying “come one come all” and “free and equal”. These messages seem very for immigration across all races and religions. The fact that everyone is eating together in a circle symbolizes a community where everyone is accepted and equal. I would support the creator’s viewpoint because it supports the immigrant’s viewpoints.

“As for the beard, we feel that if the man is religious and the beard is dear to him because the Jewish law does not allow him to shave it off, it’s up to him to decide. But if he is not religious, and the beard interferes with his earnings, it should be sacrificed.”(117) The Jewish people felt that having beards either shunned them because of their religious beliefs and it was against Jewish law for them to get rid of it. This is difficult because the ones religion is telling them one belief and the people around them are shunning them for believing it.

“In Europe, there we made a good living but here we are badly off.”(116) In Europe, Jews were given opportunities to have a reasonable life. When they migrated, people became more intolerant of others who did not live, look, and act the same ways they did. Fear caused their lives to worsen.

“It was lively in the town. There were many organizations and clubs and they all accepted me warmly, looked up to me – after all, I was a citizen of the free land, America.”(120) There is hope and promise regarding American culture and the freedoms “all” citizens have. Since we are the “promise land”, we are known to follow through with our promises. The Jews didn’t get the “warm acceptance” others received.

The immigration of Jewish people to the United States during the 19th and early 20th century represents one of the major culture shifts of our country’s history. This event affected American society at all levels. Jews and members of other minority religions couldn’t dispute from the religious views of the majority without fear of persecution. Jews still had to fight for their rights on the state level, and they continued to face various forms of prejudice nationwide.

In many respects, the motivations for the Chinese to come to the United States are similar to those of the Jewish immigrants. Some came to learn and master a trade like gold mining or railroad working. Others came to the United States to seek better economic opportunity. Others were compelled to leave China either as contract laborers or refugees. The Chinese brought with them their language and culture. Protestant and Catholic missionaries came into the unique Chinese American ghettos, establishing churches and schools and trying to convert and assimilate the Chinese, as well as recruit Chinese Americans to support and work for their causes. Those Chinese Americans who were exposed to a segregated but American education very quickly became aware of their “inferior status”. Many Chinese citizens became ashamed of their appearance, status, and culture. This meant that they had to reject their cultural and linguistic heritage and pursue American culture. Over time, Chinese culture was tolerated more by a greater number of people. Today, hate crimes still exist although I believe racism has lessened.

How to cite this essay: