Operating head: GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYOND
Genre review Course Design: Graphic Novels and Beyond
Samuel Reid
University of Minnesota
Plan B paper presented in partial fulfillment of the demands for the Master of Arts in TESOL
for degree, 2nd Language Education, Department of Curriculum & Instruction
Dec. 9, 2015
Date
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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Abstract
This paper details the creation of a training course in Genre research which focuses on four major
genre s: visual novels, narratives, description of a process, and argument rationale. Students
are taught to critically evaluate and create these texts using discourse analysis in an effort to
prepare them the rigors of reading and writing in academia. A Needs review first describes
the certain learners targeted by the course and exactly what knowledge gap it fills. Then, the paper
outlines exactly what certain learning goals have to fulfill pupil requirements. Next the paper
describes the way the mate rial in course is sequenced and explain s exactly what materials are used.
Lastly, it describes more in -depth the day -to-day work, then it explains the assessment
procedures and provides evaluative rubrics for the major assessments.
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A framework of elements pays to for a number of reasons: It provides an
organized means of conceiving of a complex procedure; it sets forth domains of
inquiry for the instructor, in that each component puts forth a few ideas aswell as
raises problems for the teacher to pursue; it offers a se t of terms presently used
in speaking about program development and thus a common professional
vocabulary and usage of the some ideas of other people. (Graves, 1996, p.12)
Introduction
For the University of Minnesota, Second Language Education, Arrange B Master’s TESOL
program, I thought we would conceive of and compose a formative paper considering pedagogy discovered and
future passions. Inside paper We describe the principles always produce a syllabus ( see Appendix
A) for a program in Genre research intended for English languag age learners on University of
Minnesota. First, we offer a Needs Assessment to show the population of students being
served and what needs of theirs i'm handling. 2nd, I supply the certain outcomes,
objectives, and material s chosen the cou rse. Third, I identify your order where the selected
material will soon be arranged. 4th, we describe the presentation of materials into the class in
regards to day -to-day work. Lastly, we explain the evaluations accustomed determine the level to
which stud ents achieve the course outcomes.
Needs Assessment
This section describes the learners who would be concerned within the course and how we might
address a few of their own, academic requirements. Needs Assessment is defined as
finding down what the learners understand and may do and what they should try to learn or
do so the program can bridge the space (or some section of it). Thus needs
assessment involves seeking and interpreting information about one’s student’s
needs so your program will address them efficiently. (Grave s, 1996, p. 12)
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While requires assessment is an ongoing procedure before, during, and following the creation and
teaching of a program (Graves, 1996, p.14), it will serve as the backbone with this paper in the
planning phases. This area defines who the learners are and their needs your course is
meeting.
Learners and Needs
The program is meant specifically for advanced level ESL students either in Intensive English
Programs (IEP s), which prepare pupils to enter English speaking Universities, or ESL
students in ir starting years of university that still struggling to meet up with their reading and
writing requirement goals. While these battles can be attributed to many facets, I
believe gaining explicit insight into how to consider genre assists students be much more mindful of
what they should do in regards to the varying writing and reading assignments provided in
university courses.
In not merely being a Writing/Reading Instructor, but in addition a Writing Consultant on campus,
I have seen numerous pupils from various acad emic levels and industries have trouble with composing. One of
the greatest challenges I have noticed is pupils struggling to create in a specific genre for the
academic community. As an example, I have seen numerous pupils battle to find out the best
ways to organ ize a compare and contrast essay, understand the different sections in a
chemistry lab report, know what to incorporate in an article summary, etc. The concept of genre has
many definitions (Schleppegrell, 2001; 2012; Bower and Ellerton, 2007; Martin, 2009; et c.) and
is knew uniquely in various procedures, but for the purposes of the paper genre will be
defined as “a distinctive category of discourse of any type, spoken or written, with or without
literary aspirations” (Swales, 1990, p. 33) involving th e social communication between persons
and teams (Swales, 1990; Bawarshi & Reiff, 2010; Hyland, 2007). Usually, students don’t even
know what forms of concerns to inquire of to articulate the problems these are typically having into the reading and
writing of these a genre. Consequently, i will be aiming to design a training course that can help pupils in
analyzing, asking about, and critiquing genres that they can come across in academia.
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This course’s absolute goal isn't to only show some certain genres, but instead make
students metacognitively aware of the concept of Genre and boost their power to analyze
components that define any text. It will be an impossible task to teach every student
everything they would need to know in a program about reading and writing of their academic
communities; besides, there is no way that i really could have the necessary history to show t hat
information. Instead, the goal is to offer students the equipment to analyze genres on the own.
As students and an instructor at the University of Minnesota (U of M), i'm grounding my
course and syllabus in the requirements set forth by the U of M. Furthermore, although my
course is not at this time in the Minnesota English Language Program’s (MELP) IEP curriculum, I
am establishing it because context considering my fam iliarity aided by the system. If you ask me, pupils in
this IEP are usually involving the many years of 18 and 22 and planning themselves to enter
undergraduate study in the usa. You will find usually some pupils, possibly older than
the mean age, th at may also be getting ready to enter graduate college. Typically recently, the
majority of pupils are Arabic speakers from Oman or Saudi Arabia and Mandarin speakers
from Asia, but you will find often several students in each course from south usa, other parts
of Asia, an such like. that comprise an inferior area of the program’s student population. Gender
distribution is fairly also. Many students are intending to entering STEM or Business fields,
rather than Humanities. This environment and these students are simply examp les, and also the course is
applicable to wider IEPs elsewhere due to the fact, as previously mentioned, it was designed to be a
generalizable scaffold to the world of academia.
My history as an English Literature undergraduate along with my affinity for
literature has encouraged another aspect of the class. Because so much genre in academia is
concerned with writing and reading, I created th is genre analysis course with a literature
component as an extension of an ESL checking and Composition course, which a lready in many
ways tries to put up pupils to achieve your goals in scholastic literacy. In addition, in my experience,
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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reading and writing are two of the hardest aspects for ESL students entering academia, so
these modalities need additional scaffolding and assistanc e.
For the main literary works component, I will provide an examination regarding the genre of graphic
novel, a relation to comics. McCloud (1993) defines comics as “Juxtaposed pictorial and other
images in deliberate series, meant to convey information and/or to make an aesthetic
response in the viewer” (p. 20), and invites other people to challenge and grow that definition. More
simply place, this could mean putting words and drawings together to convey some kind of
“aesthetic” message. Graphic novels, regarding othe r hand, have a clearer meaning. In accordance to
Gorman (2003), a graphic novel is “an original book -length tale, either fiction or nonfiction,
published in comic guide design...or an accumulation of stories that have been posted formerly as
individual com ic books" (p. xii; Chun, 2009, p. 146). Really, graphic novels are an extended
version of comics that have extra literary value. I believe this genre become approachable to
ESL pupils, run using unique genre guidelines, and diverse enough to show wri ters’ choice and
ability to improve those guidelines. By using this genre to handle major course outcomes, the course
will not only give pupils many of good use reading and writing skills for academia, but also
applicable skills inside study of other literar y and scholastic genres.
Selecting Outcomes
The previous section described pupil background and goals associated with program, which are
defined by Graves (1996) as “general statements for the overall, longterm purposes of the
course” (p. 17). This area will no w recognize and give an explanation for course results (objectives) and
objectives, or “the particular ways in which the objectives is going to be achieved” (Graves, 1996, p. 17). To
put these constructs in perspective regarding the course all together, Graves (1996) offers the
following anal ogy: “The goals of a training course represent the location; the goals, the various
points that chart the course toward the location [,and that it is] just like making a map
of the territory become explored” (p. 17). This section will first detail th e program outcomes I
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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selected. Then, it's going to provide a far more extensive description of exactly what those outcomes entail,
organized correspondingly to your results provided below.
Many for the program results in regards to genre are a grounded combination of
outcomes explor ed by Devitt (2009), Fleischer and Andrew -Vaughan (2009), Devitt, Reiff, and
Bawarshi (2004), Bullock (2005), Coe, Lingard, and Teslenko (2002), all of whom are touched
on by Bawarshi and Reiff (2010). Other people are selected through the MELP checking and Composit ion
outcomes. The remaining relate solely to additional genre goals.
Outcome categories covered in program appear below, each accompanied by statements
of what pupils will understand and be able to do.
● understanding of s pecific genres
○ Understand and create visual novel s
○ know and create text narrative s
○ Understand and produce description s of a procedure
○ Understand and produce argument rationale s
● Text Organization and Flow
○ Critically review text for company and movement using discourse analysis
○ know main tips and differentiate them written down or discussion
○ Write multi -paragraph essays with coherent organization
○ Write multi -paragraph essays with a definite thesis declaration
○ Write successful introductions and conclusions
● Critical Thinking
○ Crit ically determine soci al context of a text using discourse analysis
○ Recognize Logos/Pathos/Ethos in a text using discourse analysis
○ Create critical responses to researching
○ Write multi -paragraph essays with logos/pathos/ethos and consideration of
audience
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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● Genre certain Vocabulary and Sentence Frames
○ Recognize and understand how genre specific vocabulary and categories of words
(sentence structures) are linked to purpose using critical discourse analysis
○ Identify crucial terms in reading
○ Evaluate specific word choices utilized by an author
○ Wr ite multi -paragraph essays utilizing genre specific vocabulary
● Process Writing
○ utilize the writing process, including
composing d rafts
Engaging in p eer ratings
Revision
Analytical knowing of particular Genres
This area will detail the four major genres that stu dents is going to be expected to understand
and produce.
Graphic novels. Inside part, i'll describe why I use visual novels, a sample of
graphic novel features, and the two specific graphic novels -Boxers and Saints — that'll be used
in class.
Graphic nov els, and their progenitors, comics, are getting to be an increasingly important
resource as literary genre s. Undeniably, graphic novels have seen some of the most
explosive development inside and from the classroom in the us (Gravett, 2005; Templar,
2009). Thus, pupils are more inclined to encounter them, therefore offering pupils additional
awareness and comprehension of this genre might be essential for intellectual and cultural
growth. The graphic novel Maus, published by Art Spiegelman (1986a; 198 6b) in increments
starting in the belated twentieth century, is oft quoted due to the fact originator associated with the increase of this graphic
novel. This novel follows two major storylines. In one, main character Spiegelman (1986a;
1986b) struggles in their relationship together with his fat her, and other tale arch follows the daddy as
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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a Jewish man surviving the horrors of WW2. Such deep issues as a result of a comic — the term
graphic novel didn’t exist yet — helped leap visual novels in to the literary scene and started to
give them clout that comics did not have before.
This notion may be s coffed at because specific images might pop into your head when
someone encounters the word comic. As an example, this:
Figure 1: A Calvin and Hobbes comic by Bill Watterson. Image from Universal Uclick (2 015).
Or perhaps this
Figure 2: A Spiderman Comic from Marvel -Image from Comic Vine (2015)
However, there is certainly more towards the genre than a primary impression provides.
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Personally, i really believe visual novels are useful the ESL class room for numerous
reasons. For one, graphic novels are really multi -modal. They bridge the gap between
prose and image, and at the same time provide information in a way that neither medium could do
alone. This multi -modality fits diff erent learner styles, which in turn can market acquisition and
learning of data. Both learners whom benefit from the written term and from images can
utilize graphic novels for their advantage. Not just that, however the duality of this medium can open
up a learner with other means of learning and expressing information. Learners, particularly
kinesthetic learners, may also take advantage of this genre by participating in their creation. Secondly,
in my opinion visual novels are loaded with information and literary value in the
classroom, especially in this created course, because despite their increase in popularity, they might
be unknown to a lot of worldwide students. This enables for the classroom all together to grow
and explore together within their learnin g and application regarding the genre itself, marketing many
opportunities to engage in extensive discussion and find out about a genre possibly unknown to
them, or at least within the more unknown context of learning visual novels in the class. The
unfamiliari ty may well not hold for all students, particularly students originating from many Asian
countries where Manga is certainly popular. However, the types of Western visual novels
may differ significantly from those regarding the East, allowing more knowledgeable pupils to
simultaneously get more comprehensive about learning brand new aspects of the genre and supplying their
own unique views towards class dialogue as a whole.
In addition to my personal thinking, research has explored the learner engagement
benefits of visual novels in ESL class. Krashen, Liu, and Cary have actually all “shown how
including sequential art helps ESL populations” (Carter, 2007, p. 50). Specifically, Heckman
(2004), Templar (2009), and Krashen (2005) are finding visual novels become particularly
motivating in the ESL class, usually pushing learners to increase their literary prowess by
venturing into other mediums and genres. Heckman (2004) also notes how visual novels can
build self-confidence which help both reluctant and “remedial readers” be a little more engaged.
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International readers may still be into the learning stages and therefore likewise require more help becoming
engaged inside their reading. A proven way interest is sparke d, in accordance with Krashen (2004), is by
lowering students ’ affective filters, barriers to learning developed by anxiety. By opening those
doors, instructors might help learners become more dedicated to reading, and thus save money time
engaging in their target lang uages.
Graphic novels may also gain students in more concrete means. The juxtaposition of
picture and word, in accordance with Krashen (1989), can help pupils overcome knowledge barriers
related to grammatical and semantic problems. For instance, students mi ght have actually trouble
understanding the word ‘hirsute’, however if it really is combined with the image of an extremely hairy
character, they may get a feeling of exactly what being ‘hirsute’ entails. Cary (2004) asserts that graphic
novels also can expose students to the messiness of oral English language by exposing
language learners to “‘ ellipsis, combinations, nonwords, vague lexis, confirmation checks, contrastive
stress, new subject signals, nonverbal language, mitigators, [and] routine/ritual phrases’” (p. 33).
Such conversational ad ditions offer insight into top features of English conversation in addition to
graphic novels’ educational attributes, such as for instance crucial social conversations. These includ e but are
not limited by “racism, war, poverty, justice, inequality, gender rights” (Templar, 2009, para. 7).
Talking about such issues can act as an engagement possibility that promotes discussion
and personal growth for students.
The after paragraphs clearly describe some graphic novel features. First, the
content of visual novels is revealed in very different ways from other literary medi a, and this
style is something that will probably be explored through this course in an effort to examine the genre
and discuss it. First, the “icon” the most important features of any graphic nove l.
McCloud (1993) defines it as “any image regularly express you, place, thing, or idea” (p.
27). Essentially, this definition is the reason visual pictures in a graphic novel. McCloud (1993)
avoids the word “symbol” because of this representation of meaning, b elieving that it is too packed a term.
In other words, “symbol” sometimes implies much deeper definitions that can not be put on the
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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breadth of icons. Many icons are formed from “lines” and can represent many different meanings to
their readers. Table 1 that follow s is a small amount of examples which will be explored in my
course (Derrick, 2008):
Table 1: definitions of Some Graphic Novel Icon s
Number Icon Meaning
1 Wavy lines Smoke
2 Wavy lines with flies Bad smell
3 Trailing Lines of person or
vehicle
Movement direction
4 Dashed outline Invisibility
5 Xs in eyes Death
6 Non -bubbled text Non -speech noises or
narration
7 Bubbled text Speech
8 Bubbled text with smaller,
trailing bubbles
Thought
Numbers 1 -6 from Derrick (2008)
Derrick (2008) pushes teachers to keep yourself informed that if pupils are familiar with visual novels in
their house countries, there may be confusion as only a few icons used are exactly the same in different
cultures. Such awareness can both act as a conversation point and as ways to guarantee that
students in program are understanding the intended meanings of this texts.
McCloud (1993) describes three other inter -related areas of visual novels that will be
taught in this course. The first is the “panels”, which are the lines always differentiate moments
in a graphic novel. The second is the “gutter”, which McCloud (1993) describes merely as “the
space between your panels” (p. 66). Just what happens in the gutter may be the third aspect, “closure”, which
is about “observing the component s but perceiving the whole” (McCloud, 1993, p. 63). Put another way,
closure is really what visitors are imagining as occurring into the gutters between your panels. Closure,
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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combined because of the images and words on a typical page, allow s visitors to imagine the five senses in
wa ys nearly unique towards the genre. McCloud (1993) illustrates this point because of the after scene.
Figure 1: The 5 Senses in a Graphic Novel
From McCloud, 1993, p. 88
Readers have the ability to hear the noises associated with the kitchen through the juxtaposition of terms and
pictures, like within the chopping of a vegetable of within the ticking of a clock. They could almost feel
the temperature and odor increasing from the boiling meals. McCloud (1993) ar gues that most five senses are
represented here by integrating visitors into the medium; the artistic feeling is obvious, but
graphic novels will make visitors “perceive [that they are] in a kitchen” (p.89), allowing them
greater integration to the text.
Furthe rmore, closing, as a way to fill in the spaces between panels, communicates time
and/or movement and serves as various types of change that the course will probably explore.
McCloud (1993) explains six types of closing transitions from panel to panel which range in time
and area from “moment to moment” using one end to “non -sequitur” on the other. The moment to
moment usually represents constant action and certainly will be visualized right here:
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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Figure 2: minute to second Transition
From McCloud (1993, p. 70)
The no n-sequitur “offers no rational relationship whatsoever” (p. 72) and will be viewed right here:
Figure 3: Non -Sequitur Transition —
From McCloud (1993, p. 72)
Each kind of change requires a different sort of quantity of engagement and work from reader,
and exploring your choices authors make in their transitions including what they do for the story
may be essential components for analysis of visual novels.
The remainder of the section is dedicated to introducing the specific graphic novels
students would be reading inside program — Boxers and Saints by Gene Luen Yang (2013a; 2013b)
(see Figure 4 below). Boxers and Saints are two graphic novels that i believe act as a great
entry point in to the genre and can motivate a lot of great discussion and analysis. These two
historical fiction graphic novels are towards Boxer Rebellion in China that occurred in the late
nineteenth to very early twentieth hundreds of years. Furthermore, they blend fantastical mysticism, in form
of spirits and energy, with all the historical genre of the pl ots. Due to the cartoonish, and yet
sometimes jarring, physical violence, I would say these novels had been written mainly for US high
schoolers, although I instead enjoyed them as an adult and think the y have reached an ideal level for
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advanced ESL students. Yang (2013a; 2013b) explores lots of the following themes: war,
religion, violence, mysticism, love, lust, right and incorrect, the greater good, justice, self discovery,
and more. Boxers is about a new male protagonist, Bao, growing u p in Asia, who sees the
world around him changing. Endowed utilizing the spirits of ancient China, Bao grows from a young
boy to get to be the frontrunner of the Righteous and Harmonious Fist (RHF), an organization committed to
ridding Asia of “foreign Devils,” the Christian s and imperialists, and “secondary devils,” those
Chinese who've become Christians on their own. We come across Bao battle guilt and turmoil as he
tries to reconcile his or her own actions against the fat of a changing world. Saints is in the same
time period and para llels the plot of Boxers, but it is told from the perspective regarding the other part of
the conflict. The m ain protagonist, Four -Girl, later on known as Vibiana, is a woman who
discovers Christianity as a way to fight contrary to the oppression of her family. Mu ch like Bao,
Vibiana gains the alliance of a spirit in the form of Joan of Arc. Through this, Vibiana discovers
that the woman devote the world would be to battle up against the Boxers that have visited destroy the lady and the woman folk.
The novels’ protagonists intersect at very b rief but crucial moments into the stories as these
characters battle for their opinions and place on earth. Like most tales of war, it becomes
clear that nobody really wins.
Figure 4: Boxers and Saints Graphic Novel Book Covers
Yang’s (2013a; 2013b) utilization of built-in dream was both a driving force for, and one of
the most interesting parts of, these two novels. In Boxers, each person in the RHF during
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battle becomes a “Spirit of Opera”, or a figure from China’s past and Chinese mythologies
that is seen in the movie theater. This change can be seen as both an empowerment and
in an effort to hide from shame of these violent actions. The protagonists could be seen as
playing a part of a grand play in the place of as killers associated with innocent an d accountable alike. In Saints,
those Boxer warriors are visually revealed without their spirits, and are usually viewed as the armed
young individuals who they truly are. Vibiana’s spirit, Joan, is more a personal guidance force, but one
that can be ready to push the young prota gonist towards physical violence. Utilization of both religious figures
reflects the violent reputation for faith and imperialism that have plagued humanity for millennia.
Like much historic fiction, Yang’s (2013a; 2013b) novels are centered around a conflict, but
this t ime your reader gains insight into both edges. Such humanization doesn’t attempt to ask whom was
right, but rather exactly what it had been that drove the conflict. These personal revelations create a
dichotomy of feelings that leave your reader rooting for no -one and everyon age simultaneously,
understanding that the true tragedy is the historical and social forces that can push people to
push straight back.
I think both of these novels would fit completely into a classroom bent on introducing
graphic novels as a genre, not just because of the ir type, but in addition the ir content. If the class
were occur MELP, student knowledge would produce a really interesting dynamic inside classroom.
The typical MELP class, if you ask me, usually consist of between 30 -50% or more
Chinese students. This wou ld provide a fascinating program powerful, with pupils whom are
possibly acquainted the topic and students that are most likely less therefore. The Chinese students
may be able to accept more leadership during the reading and may have the ability to offer
more b ackground to enrich the conversations. But one other students may not be at a
disadvantage. They'll certainly be able to include their very own experience s to the discussion, and gives their
own perspective s. The novels should provide comparable multiple perspectives to th e Chinese students
as well because of the double views associated with readings – specially since, since will be
described below, h alf the class may be assigned to read one novel and the last half the other.
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Text narratives. This part will describe the T ext Narrative genre therefore the specific
narrative novel used in class.
According to Cooley (2013), narratives tell “a story; it reports ‘what happened’” (p. 123).
In countless means, narratives follow all of the same content patterns as visual novels. For
example, they truly are temporally linear typically, although a lot of novels will leap back and
forth through time besides. They follow figures through some period of time, tracing their
actions, message, thoughts, and relationships with other characters a nd in the environment.
However, text narratives shortage the images which are needed for the graphic novel genre; they
typically just use words to convey their messages, which is performed in various ways than
graphic novels. While a graphic novel might use speech bubbles to represent conversation (i.e.
circle with a pointed triangle from the presenter), a text narrat ive would make use of signals written
in prose (e.g. “quotation marks” or alert quotatives, like “said ”, “screamed ”, “cried ”,
“yelled ”, etc.). A graphic novel may indeed show a character running or swimming rather than
describing the action (age.g. “He ran up th e hill ”) as a text narrative would. Graphic novels typically
use idea bubbles (number of little bubbles leading far from a character to a bigger bubble
with their ideas) where a text narrative could make use of the quotative verb “think.” Record goes
on, but the essential distinction to keep in mind between visual novels and narratives is,
respectively, the utilization of images along with terms vs. just words.
Text n arratives, similar to genres, can belong to many subcategories, and I also picked the
novel memoir, A Lo ng means Gone by Ismael Beah (2007) ( see Figure 5 below), to parallel the
content and themes for the visual novels Boxers and Saints. Beah’s (2007) text mirrors the ir
themes of war, physical violence, right and wrong, justice, and self -discovery. This memoir follows
Ishmael as a kid in Sierra Leone in the midst of a war. After fleeing from rebels attacking his
village, Ishmael subsequently flees through country before fundamentally becoming a child
soldier. The book is a constant battle between illusory reprieves and sudden, jarring violence.
The reader witnesses Ismael striving to survive in a world where terror and violence reign, only
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for him to be conscripted to the circle of violence as a young child soldier. After being rescued later,
Ismael has to find himself and his devote the world, but also this journey is marred by more
violence while the ceaseless brutality of war. Similar to Boxers and Saints, Beah’s (2007) novel
makes your reader concern typical views on war and violence, examine truth from differe nt
points of view, and comprehend, again, that war has no winners.
Figure 5 a considerable ways Gone by Ishmael Beah Book Cover
Description of an activity. This area explains the Description of a Process genre and
gives instance s of texts to be utilized in course.
The Description of a procedure genre may be utilized as the connection from graphic
novel/narrative literary genres into more scholastic genres. Cooley (2013) defines this genre as
breaking “a process into the series of actions that result in its end result”. Put another way, it is
“‘how to’ writing” (p. 292) that organizes time into sequenced actions. It may be one thing as
simple as how exactly to put a ball or because complex as creating a mission to area. This genre
includes modern actions the audience to check out, and often, similar ly to graphic novels,
incorporates both prose and imag es. One particular challenge for ESL students in
understanding and writing this genre is its use of transfer of data from visual image to
prose and straight back, to make clear the method sequences. They've gotten some training while
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
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writing their particular visual novels, but this genre will delve even deeper in to the academic
relationship between image and prose. Pictures in this genre, in accordance with Bartolic (1981),
convey both implicit and explicit information. As a result, pupils could need to clarify and explai n
deeper the implicit information of a graphic if it is incorporated into an activity description.
Bartolic (1981) outlines steps to more easily transfer information from a graphic to prose, which
will be beneficial to pupils in writing of their own pr ocesses: “identification of symbols” to
clarify document, writing down steps as sentences, producing paragraphs with necessary formal
features, and finally, if required, summarizing the details (pp. 194 -197). This may help
students both transfer informati on from the image to prose and help them comprehend the time
organization of a sequenced process.
The Description of an activity unit could have no extensive novel text; instead, students will
mainly be reading from their program text, Cooley’s (2013) The No rton Sampler: brief Essays for
Composition (8th ed), which can be described below. One of these text that'll be look over is Jessica
Walden’s (2013) Chasing Loons. In it, she describes a summer task where she's to study
loons in north Wisconsin, which conseque ntly offers students some Midwestern United States Of America culture.
Walden (2013) overall defines a process: exactly how the girl team monitored and accumulated information on loons.
Moreover, the written text includes smaller explanations like just how to catch a loon and how a loon
survives. The reading eve letter incorporates an image of a loon to complement its survival features. Along
with this text, students is reading other articles from Cooley (2013), including Katz (2013)
exactly how Boys Become guys or Skinner’s (2013) How to Write a Poem.
Argument Rationale. This part explains the Argument Rationale genre and gives
example texts to be used into the course.
The last genre could be the Argument Rationale. This genre justifies or explain s the actions of
a person, process, or thing. Furthermore, it's the “strategic use of language to persuade an
audience to agree with you on a concern or even to act in a way that you think is right -or at the very least to
hear you away, even though they disagree with you” (Cooley, 2013, p. 517). Writers, according to
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
20
Cooley (2013), provide their argume nts to audiences with “reason”, “emotion”, and “ethics”, and
to achieve this, writers utilize evidence and support since it is inadequate to merely ask a reader to
agree -they should be offered reasons to be convinced by the writer (p. 517). Cooley’s (2013)
methods of persuasion are in fact logos, pathos, and ethos, that are described below. Th e
argument rationale genre is roofed as an academic method of justifying and supporting a
student’s argument.
This genre’s readings will also come from Cooley’s (2013) tex t. As an example, White and
Art’s (2013) Should Batman Kill the Joker? is not just an amazing bridge through the previous graphic
novel units, but it is also serves as an appealing exemplory instance of an Argument Rationale. The
authors explain feasible grounds for kill ing the Joker, one of Batman’s many archetypical foes,
as well as good reasons for permitting him live. To do so, they cite sources and make use of logic to argue both
sides of debate. They also bridge the fictional world to the real-world, directing visitors’
attentio n far from the initial concern and asking whenever we could apply the same thinking to
real globe terrorists and crooks. This makes the readers think much deeper about their own
preconceived ideas about Batman’s situation and pushes on visitors’ feelings. Ultim ately,
White and Art’s (2013) argument doesn’t answer whether Batman should kill the Joker or not,
but instead contends that comics along with other works of fiction might help us think through our
philosophies.
Text Organization and Flow
This section describes the se cond major pupil learning results of the program, Text
Organization and Flow. Pupils will comprehend primary a few ideas of a reading passage and
distinguish them on paper. Reading comprehension in another language is extremely
challenging, therefore understandi ng the corporation and details of just what an author is trying to
say ought to be a required goal to enhance reading skills. Text company and flow may
include location/inclusion of thesis, formatting, paper parts/sections, movement between
sections, e tc. Students will gain an understanding of exactly how text company and flow might differ
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
21
in the four genres covered in course: Graphic Novels, Text Narratives, definition of a procedure,
and Argument Rationales. By asking questions about these aspects of genre analysis using
critical discourse analysis, pupils gets a much better knowledge of how and just why information
is provided in how its. On paper in academia, it is almost always important to get a few ideas down in
an organized and succinct manner and help those ideas. Pupils may also be in a position to not
only write essays with an introduction which includes a definite thesis declaration, but in addition write
cohesive paragraphs with diverse and supporting evidence that cause a good conclusion.
Then, organizing one’s m ain points in writing assists reveal that a reader has in fact understood
how to create the text’s company and flow.
Critical Thinking
This part describes the third pupil learning outcome of the course, Critical Thinking.
Critical Thinking calls for pupils to utilize critical discourse analysis to understand the social
contexts of texts they read. This requires such challenging questions from Devitt, Reiff, and
Bawarshi (2004) as that is allowed to partic ipate in text and exactly what functions for readings and
writers are encouraged/discouraged, and others, like: what motivations and purpose an
author has (e.g. persuading, informing, explaining, pleading, etc). These concerns and
answers are essent ial so pupils understand that there are reasons for utilization of language
and values inherent in just about any offered genre. Because they progress in their own studies, this can prepare
students to inquire of the tough questions about their particular communities and learn the purpos es of
certain genres in these unique communities. Students cannot simply be in a position to critically
respond to their readings (age.g. novels and academic genres), but also prepare for and
participate in class conversation according to those reactions. Responding thou ghtfully to readings
and speaking about all of them with peers can be a big element of educational classrooms, so these skills
could be probably one of the most important to master, with respect to the student’s field.
The primary reason for numerous scholastic writing genres should persuad age the audience, so
students will more than likely must understand the method of persuasion using the rhetorical devices
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
22
Logos, Pathos, and Ethos, known as the rhetorical triangle. Logos aims to make use of logic to sway
readers, Pathos performs at heartstrings associated with the rea der, and Ethos attempts to persuade the reader
using prestigious and knowledgeable sources of information. To take action, Ethos makes use of citation.
Backing up one’s tips with diverse and strong proof, like the research and thoughts of
others, is an essential ability in most educational communities, and it is most likely useful to
professional writing tasks also. Plagiarism guidelines and copyright laws are serious issues in
these two realms, so awareness and proficiency are needed in order to avoid exactly what can be really serious
real globe consequences.
To realize the rhetorical triangle, students will soon be analyzing their major readings and
other articles the usage of logos, pathos and ethos, also producing them on paper. Of
course, each one of the major product genres use s critical thinking and rhetorical products in unique
ways. The visual novels Boxers and Saints are about understanding and identifying the two
opposing viewpoints therefore the pathos, or emotions, inherent in the governmental decisions. The text
narrative is extremely mu ch the exact same, for the reason that it is crucial to comprehend the author’s point of view
and text organization. The narrative novel, quite a distance Gone, makes the readers question
opposing viewpoints and think critically towards figures and their motivations. The letter arrative
is delivered minus the pictures, resources and traits that define the visual novel. Writing a
description of a procedure is worried primarily with logos, or the reasoning behind a sequence
of steps; composing Argument Rationales deal s along with thr ee rhetorical products -logos, pathos, and
ethos — to describe the reasoning behind various genres.
Discipline Specific Vocabulary and Sentence Frames
This part describes the fourth major result listed, Discipline Particular Vocabulary and
Sentence Frames. Th is outcome will push pupils toward recogniz ing unique vocabulary and
sentence structures inside their readings, the way they should comprehend them, and how they might be
used in writing various genres. Particularly, for example, they could utilize critical discourse anal ysis
to recognize exactly how purpose leads to the selection of language in a genre. Additionally, they can
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
23
note exactly how some complex vocabulary pertaining to the industry can be used with no definition, which
will also tie back once again to previous analysis research regarding that is excluded and contained in the
communication. Students, particularly when looking at genres outside their industries, may not
understand lots of the complex or certain language terms in certain genre. The important
thing is to recognize how that vocabula ry is used and develop methods of best
understand a reading that makes use of such language.
Process Writing
This section explains the fifth and last major student learning outcome of the program,
Process Writing of genres. Pupils can reproduce bits of and whole genres based
on their analyses. They will get the possiblity to utilize process writing to make genre writing
based on information presented in class and their own analyses. Students will demonstrate the
writing process, including drafting, revising, modifying, peer reviewing, etc, to create examples of
different genres. Writing is a continuous procedure; pupils will have to realize that written products
are seldom ‘perfect’ the very first time (nor the final), and th at the procedure needs revision and upgrading.
Writing normally a social procedure; reviewing making use of their peers is generally useful, and it can
reinforce the idea that their products aren't created in a vacuum. Maybe not understanding this social
context facet of gen re reading and writing has in the past been an important critique of teaching
genres.
Bawarshi and Reiff (2010) describe critics’ worries that blindly after a structure without
thinking about context eliminates vocals as writers want to “write corre ctly” (35), giving
the feeling that there surely is only one solution to convey meaning in a genre text. Such a “straitjacket”
(Gebhard, 2012, p. 801), writers lose their ability to select. According to Bawarshi and Reiff
(2010), without power to select, writ ers, specially minority groups, can become
marginalized and become pressed “further toward side” (p. 32) inside their challenge for sound in academia.
Kress (2003) contends that by viewing aspects of genres as tangible rules, pupils can fail to
understand the “‘s ocial relations and contexts’” inherent in discourse communities (Bawarshi
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
24
and Reiff, 2010, p. 35), which Cope and Kalantzis (1993) speculate further creates an uncritical
viewing of genre as just a linear process.
There are some approaches to teach genre awareness and analysis that mitigate these
critiques, which is integrated into this course. First, Feez and Joyce (1998) argue for a
“building the context” phase. In this stage, students can explore and start to become made alert to the social
context, and/or r easoning and interlocutor relationships within the discourse community that uses the
genre they have been wanting to work in. Inside course the social contexts will likely be included heavily in our
discussions and analysis of genre. This can help mitigate arguments that stud ents are blindly
following a pattern being marginalized in the process. Indeed, the world is filled with
situations in which certain social teams accept only specific language and ways of talking,
and these socio social guidelines cannot be learned sepa rately from language. Schleppegrell
(2001) argues that once you understand just what linguistic choices are available for particular circumstances is a part
of learning “sociolinguistic competence” (p. 436). Pupils learning about genre and their
frames can better comprehend the explanation for each genre also just how to fit their own
particular sound and style in to the genre. Teachers may also avoid just teaching the form of a
genre by t ying the shape to “rhetorical and social actions” (Bawarshi & Reiff, 2010, p. 123).
Mitc hell and Andrews (1994) add that the method paper structure and style are formed creates
valuable discussion inside classroom. Within course the structures inherent in specific genres
will be framed as values associated with the community in which that genre is being utilize d; speaking about these
values could be an invaluable usage of time for developing understanding of genre analysis.
It is important to stress choice in learning how to compose genre analysis, as Hyland (2007)
explains:
Selecting a specific genre implies the usage of certa in patterns, but this will not dictate
the way we write. It enables united states in order to make alternatives and facilitates expression. The power to
create meaning is only authorized by the possibility of alternatives. By ensuring
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
25
these options are available to pupils, we provide them with the chance to make such
choices. (p. 152)
Similarly, Swales (1990) walks his visitors through a genre instance, where he gives multiple
options for the different moves and steps. Kind isn't contrived in their instance; as an alternative, he
reveals ho w there are numerous, formal options to choose from. Students aren't dictated by
the constraints of genre; rather, the genre is a medium through which they are able to express
choice in constructing interaction centered on who the sensed audience is. It's necessary
to find balance between individual choice and objectives of that market. Lastly,
Gebhard (2012) summarizes various research studies to conclude that “there is nothing
inherently prescriptive, uncritical, or prosaic” (p. 810) about a t eaching approach that train es
what types can be found in provided genres. Teaching genre through language function is a
gateway to linguistic choice and joining educational communities currently established, and is a
viable approach to presenting pupils to learn ing the communicative challenges of these
communities.
Sequencing Material
This area explains the way the material was put into an ordered series in the
course, plus it answers the following concerns from Graves (1996): (1) “just how can I organize the
con tent and tasks?” (2) “just what systems will I develop?” (p. 28). Systems assistance organize
classroom framework at both the concept level and in the program as a whole (Graves, 1996, p.
28). Graves (1996) offers two major, interconnected varieties of sequencin g systems — “building”
and “recycling”, both that will be use d in the sequencing of course materials and outcomes.
Building is moving
from simple to complex, from more concrete to more open ended, or so that product or
activity A prepares pupils for product or task B … [ and recycling is when ] students
encounter previous material in new means: in a new skill area, in another kind of
activity, or with a new focus. (Graves, 1996, p.28)
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
26
To help think through general organization, Graves (1996) additionally gives two more means of
sequencing program activities: “matrix” and “cycle.” Matrix is when a “teacher works together a group of
possible activities for a given period of time and, because the course advances, decides which activities
to work with” (p. 29). Although thi s approach may possibly occur in the teaching for the program while
assigning smaller activities, it willn’t play as large part for the purposes of this paper, which
focuses more in the macro versus micro level. I will be, however, utilising the cyclical
approach, that is understood to be a “regular cycle of activities [which] follows a consistent
sequence” (p.29). Different facets of my class, described below, will come in rounds so
students have actually consistent habits of classroom structure and timing, so they really learn of what
to expect. Offering recognizable rounds can also help connect materials together and present students
established routes to the office through challenging material.
dining table 2 below provides a synopsis for the 15 week sequence of subjects and tasks,
and would be referenced when it comes to conversation of these sequential sub -cycles: (1) Critical
Discourse Analysis Cycle; (2) Major Genre Sequence; (3) Fleischer and Andrew -Vaughan’s
(2009) steps.
TABLE 2: Course Schedule d Sequence of strategies With Weekly Course Obj ectives
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
27
Week Tuesday -Day 1 Thursday -Day 2 Weekly Course
Objectives
1 -Introduce Course
-Introduce Genre
-Critical Genre research: discover about
and evaluate texts for purpose, social
power, and s ocial contexts in pair,
group, and whole class work.
Students will likely to be able
to (SWBAT):
-Understand the
concept of Genre
-Know just what the main
goals associated with program will
be
-Begin to articulate
questions and
discover answers
related to purpose,
social power, and
social contexts in
various texts using
discourse analysis
2 -Introduce the Graphic Novel (major
unit one)
-Explore Graphic Novels and their
features
-Assign students a Graphic Novel
Bibliography for further text
exploration
-Critical Genre research: discover about
and analyze texts for purpose, social
power, and s ocial context in pair,
group, and whole class work.
-Explore visual novels and their
features further in pairs so when a whole
class.
SWBAT:
-Describe some
features of graphic
novels
-Understand just how to
read a graphic novel
-Understand
vocabulary associated to
graphic novels
-Gain background
information on the
graphic novel genre
and learn about
different graphic novel
texts
-articulate questions
and discover answers
related to purpose,
soc ial energy, and
social contexts in
various texts using
discourse analysis
3 -Finish 1/3 of Boxers and Saints for
today
-Discuss novels with Literature Circle
groups and as a class
-Continue to talk about top features of the
graphic novel
-Critical Genre Analysis: Learn About
and Analyze Texts for Organization
and Flow in pairs and also as a whole class
SWBAT:
-Understand content of
their graphic novel and
discuss them in
groups
-Understand and
identify visual novel
features in their
graphic novel
-articulate questions
and discover answers
related to text
organization and flow
in vari ous texts using
discourse analysis
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
28
4 -Finish 2/3 of Boxers and Saints for
Today
-Discuss novels with Literature Circle
groups so that as an entire class
-Continue to go over top features of the
graphic novel
-Critical Genre review: discover About
and Analyze Texts for Organization
and Flow in pairs and also as an entire class
SWBAT:
-Understand content of
their visual novel and
discuss them in
groups
-Understand and
identify graphic novel
features in their
graphic novel
-articulate questions
and discover answers
related to text
organization and flow
in various texts using
discourse analysis
5 -Finish Boxers and Saints for Today
-Discuss novels with Literature Circle
groups and also as a complete class
-Continue to go over top features of the
graphic novel
-Assign Essay 1: Graphic N ovel How
to Book
-Critical Genre Analysis: discover about
and Analyze Logos/Pathos/Ethos in
texts in pairs a nd all together class
-Briefly introduce A Long Way Gone
narrative
SWBAT:
-Understand content of
their graphic novel and
discuss them in
groups
-Understand and
identify graphic novel
features in their
graphic novel
-Understand Logos,
Pathos, and Ethos
-Articulate and ask
questions associated to
purpose in various
texts making use of discourse
analysis -Begin to write
organized essay on
graphic novel features
6 -Critical Genre research: Learn about
and Analyze Logos/Pathos/Ethos in
texts in pairs and also as a complete class
-Continue to understand and exercise APA
citation format
-Do In Class Peer Review 1 -Essay 1 —
Graphic Novel just how to Book
-Finish first selected reading o f A Long
Way Gone narrative for today (major
unit 2)
-Discuss novel section with Literature
Circle Groups and as an entire class
-Discuss top features of a narrative
-Do In Class Peer Review 2 -Essay 1 —
Graphic Novel how exactly to Book
SWBAT:
-understand features
of APA citation format
and utilizing it
-Understand Logos,
Pathos, and Ethos
-Articulate and ask
questions related to
purpose in various
texts using discourse
analysis
-Understand content
and top features of a
narrative, and
articulate them in
groups with reference to
their novel
-Begin to write
organized essay on
graphic novel features
-Work with peers to
improve each other's’
writing
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
29
7 -Finish 2nd chosen reading of A
Long Way Gone narrative for today
-Discuss novel part with Literature
Circle Groups so that as a whole class
-Continue to talk about top features of a
narrative
-Essay 1: Graphic Novel just how to
Book due
-Critical Genre Analysis: discover about
and talk about Genre certain Vocab in
pairs so when a whole class
SWBAT:
-Understand content
and top features of a
narrative, and
articulate them in
groups with reference to
their novel
-Finish organized
essay on graphic
novel features
-Ask concerns about
and understand how
genre specific
vocabulary is used in
texts using discourse
analysis
8 -Finish third selected reading of A
Long Method Gone Narrative for today
--Discuss novel area with
Literature Circle Groups so when a
whole class
-Continue to discuss top features of a
narrative
-Assign Essay 2 -Writing a Narrative
-Give pupils work time on Essay 2 —
Writing a Narrative
SWBAT:
-Understand content
and options that come with a
narrative, and
articulate them in
groups in regards to
their novel
-Use the writing
process to begin
writing Essay 2
9 -Do Peer Review 1 -Essay 2 -Writing a
Narrative
-Critical Genre Analysis: Puttin’ it All
Together -Ana lyze genres for all
discourse analysis features learned
in class
-Do Peer Review 2 -Essay 2 -Writing a
Narrative
-Discuss course reading on Description
of a Process (major unit 3)
-Discuss top features of Description of a
Process writing
SWBAT:
-Work with peers to
improve both's’
writing
-Write successful
essays with regards to
organization, purpose,
and content
-Ask concerns and
articulate function,
organization,
vocabulary, and social
context s of various
texts making use of discourse
analysis
-Begin to understand
features of Description
of an activity Writing
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
30
10 -Students will brainstorm 2 -3
Description of a procedure topics
-Brainstorm procedure steps and then
discuss with partner
-Continue to discuss features of
Description of a procedure writing
-Essay 2 -Writing a N arrative due
-Create/Brainstorm images related to
Description of a Process subject steps
from Tuesday
-Students will choose one image and
practice writing prose steps to match
image
SWBAT:
-Understand features
of Description of a
Process Writing
-Brainstorm topics as
part associated with the writing
process (to not be
confused with
Description of a
Process)
-Integrate pictures and
prose together as part
of Description of a
Process
--Write successful
essays when it comes to
organization, purpose,
and content
11 -Students will decide on their subject for
writing a Description of a Process
paper.
-Work on sentence frames for
Description of a Process
-Assign Essay 3 -Description of a
Process
-Critical Genre review: Puttin’ it All
Together -Continue to practice
analyzi ng genres for several discourse
analysis features discovered in class
-Give students work time on Essay 3 —
Description of a Process
SWBAT:
-Understand features
of Description of a
Process and commence to
articulate it in writing
-Ask questions and
articulate function,
organization,
vocabulary, and social
context s of various
texts using discourse
analysis
--Write successful
essays with regards to
organization, cause,
and content
12 -Do Peer Review 1 -Essay 3 —
Description of a Proce ss
-Review citation before Unit 4
-Discuss and analyze options that come with an
Argument Rationale genre (major unit
4)
-Do Peer Review 2 -Essay 3 —
Description of a Process
SWBAT:
-Understand and
articulate features of
an Argument
Rationale
-understand features
of APA citation format
and utilizing it
-Write successful
essays with regards to
organization, purpose,
and content
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
31
13 -Brainstorm and practice writing an
argument rationale for one of the
students’ explanation of a Process
writings
-Review Logos/Pathos/Eth os
-Essay 3 -Description of a Process
due
-Review Graphic novel and narrative
prose novel
-Brainstorm Rationales for a character
from pupils’ visual novel or
narrative novel
-Assign essay 4 -Argument Rationale
SWBAT:
--Understand and
articulate features of
an Argument
Rationale
-Work with peers to
improve one another's’
writing
-Understand Logos,
Pathos, and Ethos
-Articulate and ask
questions associated to
purpose
-Understand and
articulate features and
content for the graphic
novels and prose
novel discovered in class
-Use the writing
process (never to be
confused with
Description of a
Process )
14 -Give pupils work time on Essay 4 —
Argument Rationale
-Do Peer Review 1 -Essay 4 -Argument
Rationale
-Critical Genre review: last Puttin’ it
All Together -Continue to practice
analyzing genres for several discourse
analysis features learned in class
SWBAT:
-Write successful
essays with regards to
organization, function,
and content
--Work with peers to
impro ve one another's’
writing
--Ask concerns and
articulate purpose,
organization,
vocabulary, and social
context s of various
texts using discourse
analysis
15 -Peer Review 2 -Essay 4 -Argument
Rationale
-Give pupils work time on essay as
this is a busy period of the year
-Essay 4 -Argument Rationale due
-In course Reflection
-Last day's class celebration!!!
SWBAT:
-Write successful
essays when it comes to
organization, purpose,
and content
--Work with peers to
improve both's’
writing
-Reflect on all that
they have learned over
the length of the
semester
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
32
Critical Discourse Analysis System
During the semester, pupils will discover ways to critically analyze genre with focused
discourse analysis tasks. The following will explain exactly what pupils will soon be abl age to do in those
activities utilizing discourse analysis.
1. Cri tically evaluate social context s of a text utilizing discourse analysis
2. Critically analyze text for company and movement using discourse analysis
3. Recognize Logos/Pathos/Ethos in a text making use of discourse analysis
4. Recognize and know the way genre certain language and sets of terms
(sentence frames) are associated with cause making use of critical discourse analysis
These four major learning goals, which address the results of Critical Genre
Analysis in Tab le 2 above, are separately introduced through the entire very first seven months of the
semester, though they will also be incorporated along with other facets of the course. This might be to focus on
these results individually plus in depth, regardless if the course can be also touching on all
of them later on in the program in regards to the four major genres. Practicing them in the first half of
the semester additionally helps to ensure that pupils take what they learned from these outcomes and
build off of that knowledg age in later months for the semester. More over, times is arranged for
students to do extra joint discourse analysis in subsequent days, also let them have some time
to review by the end associated with semester. The next sections will shortly talk about the r easoning
behind the order which each goal for the Critical Discourse Analysis System will be
addressed.
1. Cri tically evaluate social context s of a text using discourse analysis. This
objective should be taught first, once the discourse analysis requi res students to come out of their
perspective and think about the energy inherent in various communities in academia. In other
words, pupils must learn or imagine during the social context of a genre. Not only this, they
may most likely must also need to confront privilege associated with various communities.
This can be very challenging and sometimes uncomfortable to talk about, especially in a second
language. But, i do believe this issue should still be explored first into the semester. As mentioned in the
Wr iting procedure area under picking Outcomes, without critical thinking and without helping
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
33
students realize the social context, teaching genre means advertising pupils’ creation of
genre without thought. A focus with this objective may also support the visual novel reading and
discussion, which involve understanding multiple perspectives, in something as terrible
and destructive as war. Therefore, this part of the period is supposed to be undertaken at the beginning of the semester, and
then continu ed throughout.
2. Critical ly assess text for organization and flow using discourse analysis. Text
Organization and Flow will likely to be presented next. Pupils are acquainted with some typical
organizational patterns in a few American English genres, from other classes or high stakes
Int ernational tests like TOEFL or IELTS, therefore discussing it early in the day gives them a scaffold into
asking concerns for and researching genre analysis. Since an analysis of company and
flow happens after critically analyzing the social context of gen re, pupils gets the chance
to link exactly how organization of a text might connect with the social contexts as well as the values of the
genre community. Finally, students will benefit from studying organization and movement before
the first major writing assignm ent for the course.
3. Recognize Logos/Pathos/Ethos in a text utilizing discourse analysis. After students
have seriously considered organization and movement, function, in addition to discovered to pose critical thinking
questions, they'll be ready to address the types of a rguments article writers are going to be
making utilizing Logos/Pathos/Ethos. Put another way, pupils will currently be able to talk about and
recognize the frames for company, social history contexts, and reason for a genre.
Now, pupils you will need to discover a bout constructive techniques to persuade the audience of their
opinion making use of logos, pathos and ethos.
Recognize and know the way genre certain vocabulary and sets of terms
(sentence frames) are connected to cause utilizing critical discourse analysis. Initial three
discourse analys is learning objectives deal more using the purpose of language, which according
to Communicative Language principles (described next section), may be the initial thing in a
communicative class room to look at and discover. Journalist function will influence selection of
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
34
vocabulary and sentence frames utilized in the genre. Once purpose is set up, we look at
what linguistic kinds are used to satisfy that function and convey those definitions. Type usage
cannot be easily understood without first set ting the context for the genre.
Major Genre Sequence System
This section explains a second sequence system used in class: the order where the
four genres are covered. The four major genres used are sequenced to provide students a clear
scaffold from liter ary and perchance more straightforward to comprehend genres to more educational genres that
students will perhaps face in their academic jobs. The graphic novel genre reading and
exploration provides a clear scaffold to comprehension having its pictures, additionally the clear, nuan ced
features can make for interesting discourse analysis. The writing narrative genre comes second
because it shares all the features of the graphic novel (e.g. character, plot, temporal
organization, and setting, speech, ideas, etc.), but removes the pictures and presents these
features in various methods – in text. As a result, students do not need to reinvent the wheel with the
major purposes and methods of the genre; they should just produce different kinds for
similar functions. The third genre, Diverses cription of a Process, bridges the space into more academic
genres. It asks pupils to just take whatever they learned about prose and image in the earlier two
temporally -ordered literary genres, and create a temporally bought genre in an academic
setting. The Ar gument Rationale may be the last genre covered because it asks pupils to look back
at the earlier genres they've learned within the program and supply educational, logical,
comprehensive, and evidence based arguments to describe events or action s occurring i n the
previous genres.
Fleischer and Andrew -Vaughan’s (2009) System
This area defines a third sequence for training genre that has been manufactured by Fleischer and
Andrew -Vaughan (2009), whom offered these steps for teaching “unfamiliar genres”, some of
which will be usage d or modif ied for teaching each genre in our course:
1) selecting a complex genre and describing why it absolutely was chosen
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
35
2) collecting samples of and reading in unfamiliar genre
3) analyzing generic patterns and creating a ‘how -to bo ok’ on writing the unknown genre
4) creating an annotated bibliography of model types of the genre
5) composing inside unfamiliar genre
6) composing a reflective letter regarding the connection with learning and creating the genre; and
soliciting a letter of resp onse from some other reader
(Bawarshi and Reiff, 2010, p. 186)
These six steps use Graves ’ (1996) building concept. They begin with arguably simpler steps of
exploration before moving onto more complex production phases. So, like, b ased on
steps 1 -4, to show the graphic novel, the introduction will involve describing why the genre was
chosen, giving students examples, and asking them to produce brief explanations of a few
researched graphic novels (in place of annotated bibliographie s, which will take too much
time to teach for the purposes of this program) in order to gain more history in the genre.
However, in step four, versus having students create a graphic novel as a later, production
based assessment, I will keep these things crea te a “ How to Book ”, described below, as their method of
showing whatever they have discovered concerning the genre. I think this serves very similar function as
writing a graphic novel, specifically: exposing knowledge about the genre, but does it in a possibly
more academic design. Since I have won't have pupils make an effort to produce a graphic novel, there will be no
need to think about it in step 6. However, the theory is helpful in that it helps students think about
how much they learned, so that it will likely be included by the end of this se mester as a way to mirror on
the course genres all together.
As shown above, these actions will soon be modified and appl ied in different ways to raised match
the other three program genres. As the text letter arrative in program can also be a literary novel,
the course will follow steps 1 -4 in much the same way as in learning the visual novel. However,
in step, as opposed to writing a “How to Book ”, students will do step 5, composing inside genre, a text
narrative. This is certainly further step-by-step below and can act as the summ ative essay because of this unit of the
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
36
course. The very last two genres, explanation of an activity and Argument Rationale, uses and
modify the cycle further. The students will explore the genres in very similar means as the
previous two, nonetheless they won't be requir ed to do step 2 (search for samples ) because this would
require deeper research abilities compared to the results for the course need. They are going to be asked
to do move 5, write inside genre, because at this point into the semester, the evaluation of learning
outcom es requires that pupils create writing that illustrates a more relevant and
generalizable academic function.
Presentation of Material
This area asks “ just how and with just what will we show the program? What's my part? What are
my students’ roles?” (Graves, 1996, p. 26). To phrase it differently, this section describes the methods
use d in course as well as instance tasks or projects to illustrate how the method is
actually applied into the program. What is important in my experience is to never be linked with any
one solitary technique, teaching design, or task, as there clearly was “no single most useful method” (Larsen —
Freeman & Anderson, 2011, p. 226). The focus is on variety to fit different student styles,
defined as “natural, habitual, and favored means(s) of absorbing, processing, and retaining new
information and skills” (Reid, 1995, p. viii). First i'll briefly explain Communicative Language
Teaching, the general training methodology utilized in the course. However gives an explanation
of the daily schedule.
Teaching With Comm unicative Language and Group Work
Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) is an important method of language teaching that
guide s this program design as well as its objectives. CLT “aims broadly to make communicative competence
the goal of language teaching” (Larsen -Freeman & Anderson, 2011, p. 115). Larsen -Freeman
and Anderson (2011) describe various areas of CLT: “one function can have many kinds; …
the social context regarding the communicative event is important in giving meaning to utterances ;”,
communicative competence is due to properly making use of appropriate kinds; option is important in
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
37
speaking; and “grammar and language that pupils learn follow from function, situational
context, while the roles for the interlocutors” (pp. 120 -121).
However, CLT additionally goes beyond that. Larsen -Freeman and Anderson (2011) explain
that CLT classrooms should make use of “authentic language”, be the “vehicle for classroom
communication, not just the object of research”, tolerate errors to discover them “as a normal outcome
of development”, and invite stude nts to “express their tips and opinions” (p. 119 -120). One
way these principles will occur in this course is through team and pair work. Since pupils are in
smaller figures than they'd be in entire group, they have been more likely to get the possibility to
speak. The course will use explicit, instructor oriented activities, but a larger amount of time will
be centered on pupil oriented tasks.
Explanation of constant Schedule
This part will detail what occurs day -to-day into the class. Where there is
repetition, i'll not get into further information but will shortly describe what's occurring in every given
week. Please make reference to TABLE 2 above for reference in the following paragraphs.
Week 1. The very first week requires an introduction on course together with students’ first
chance to begin with utilizing discourse analysis. On Week 1 -Day 1, i'll be presenting the course to
the pupils by exceeding the syllabus, dealing with the schedule, objectives, and major
outcomes and projects. I shall also introduce the thought of Genre and present them a chance
to start exploring some texts. I shall place pupils into pairs to look at different genres and texts,
including, including, a newspaper, a horror novel, a fantasy novel, a compare/contrast essay,
a couple of research articles, etc. scholar s will give the class a few of the things they
noticed about their genres. This may give pupils their first possibility at distinguishing
characteristics between genres, but we will not get thorough yet. On Week 1 -Day 2, in the
students ’ very first disco urse analysis for critical thinking i shall do a presentation on social context,
power of language, and composing purpose in a genre text, offering pupils concerns to imagine about
in regards to any text. Then, i'll provide them with text samples to explore as pairs for these features
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
38
before sharing just what pupils created and speaking about once more all together team. I will
structure course time in which I introduce this issue, give pupils time and energy to work with pairs or groups,
and then finish off conversation all together group. Thi s permits me to manage the information
presented and create pupils to function, offers them time for you to talk and learn making use of their peers,
and then allows the group to benefit by learning from others who they might not need been able
to talk with.
Week 2. The se cond week includes an introduction to graphic novels and more critical
discourse analysis work. On Week 2 -Day 1, and through the entire semester, i'll do a mixture of
inductive and deductive teaching within my course, quite often for the same lessons. Inductive
reasoning, according to Lightbown and Spada (2013), is when pupils find the rules on
their very own while deductive training is when instructors give explicit instruction. The authors also
summarize research hypotheses in which learners of all of the aptitudes can ben efit from explicit
instruction, and greater aptitude students can take advantage of inductive approaches. While MELP
students’ aptitudes are of varying levels, at degree i will be teaching they ought to all be fairly high,
so many students will benefit from both sty les of learning. Varying up the techniques may also give
students with varied learning styles time for you shine.
Specifically on Week 2 -Day 1, i'll explicitly introduce how the visual novel genre is
fairly unique in its medium, that'll permit sufficient anal ysis, exactly how it's going to be a gateway into
genre conversation the class, some great benefits of visual novels for ESL students in general, the
benefits of its current status as a literary genre, etc. After that, i'll utilize inductive training, which
involves graphic no vel test research and reading. I'll distribute numerous examples of
graphic novels, including although not limited by Maus by Art Spiegelman (1986a; 1986b), Fun Home
by Alison Bechdel (2006), The Graveyard Book adapted by P. Craig Russel (2014) from Neil
Gaima n's (2008) Graveyard Book prose novel, American Born Chinese (2006) by Gene Luen
Yang, etc., that are shown in Figure 6 below.
Figure 6: A Selection of Graphic Novels
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
39
Students gets a while to explore and discuss the distinctions and similarities of
style, type, and content between the novels. Whatever they discover will likely be inductively learned.
Based on which pupils discover and personal experience, I will also provide explicit introduction
into a lot of the vocabulary of and forms in graph ic novels your students could have found
inductively. By going forward and backward between explicit and inductive learning, pupils get a
greater possiblity to uncover the material themselves, but as the instructor i am going to additionally be able to
make sure pupils learn what I want them to. Discovery and deeper understanding of these graphic
novel forms will also think about it Week 2 -Day 2 as well as in later weeks. Lastly, on Day 2, pupils will
get more time to explore purpose, social context, and social energy with both visual n ovels
and other texts. Additional exploration through discourse analysis can take in different forms
throughout the semester, but, per Grave’s (1996) matrix approach (described formerly), we will
choose more certain tasks as I am in fact teaching t he program.
Week 3. On Week 3 -Day 1, students works with literature groups once the automobile to
discuss the visual novels, Boxers and Saints and do individual discourse analysis for Text
Organization and Flow. Students will likely to be reading the novel in chunks over a three week duration.
To guide their reading and prepare them for conversations, students can get rotating functions. Some
potential literature group functions, based on Cappellini (2005), are conversation leader, literary
luminary, summarizer, language finder, etc. Discussion frontrunner arises with concerns to
keep talks going and challenge their classmates. Literary luminary discovers passages that
are interesting one way or another or are incredibly important to th age novel. One feasible role that we will
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
40
add will be to mention features special to visual novels, f or instance, instances where time,
motion, the 5 sensory faculties, or other options that come with graphic novels, discus sed previously, are represented
in Boxers or Saints. Th is method, the discussion need a certain bent towards the unique
features for the genre itself. Following the pupils have experienced time and energy to discuss the novel with their
groups, I will place the pupils into groups of four such as representatives from each novel,
so they could share their part and find out another part of the story (recall that Boxers and
Saints are a couple of views on the same historic event). Finally, we are going to move the discussion
to entire groups in which I will first ask each side to introdu ce their novel and exactly what has happened
so far. In that way, I will get an idea of exactly what the teams talked about within their discussion, apart from
just overhearing the student’s conversations.
Week 4. In Week 4 pupils continues to talk about in literary works sectors, graphic novels
in basic, and discourse analysis of Text Organization and Flow.
Week 5. Week 5 also add literary works sectors for the graphic novel and discourse
analysis, but it will also range from the introduction for the very first major essay — the “How to
Book ”, including an introduction to Logos/Pathos/Ethos, APA citation, and a short introduction
to the pupils’ next genre. On Week 5 Day 1 i am going to let them have directions to create a How to
Book on composing graphic novels: i am going to tell students generate helpful information on how to make and read a
graphic novel, and they might include such visual novel features as panels, closure,
picture purchase on a page, etc. I'll pass out instructions the essay and provide paragraph
examples, like the following:
Reading purchase in a graphic novel typically follows panels from left to write and top to
bottom, much like a normal novel; however, that isn't always essentially the situation. For
example, the whole web page might consist of one image, without panels. In cases like this, the
reader usually takes within the whole image, yet still follow any written terms from top kept to
bottom right, the same as they'd generally in a web page with panels. Another example would
be panels that use up an entire horizontal or column of a typical page, but is follow ed by smaller
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
41
panels. The reader would start reading the bigger panel and stick to the normal
reading pattern to another panels. These are just a couple examples of just how a reader
would stick to the course of a graphic novel.
We will talk about possible organ izations the “exactly how T o Book”, and students will get an opportunity to
ask questions about the essay generally. The creation of the “exactly how T o Book ” will reveal
knowledge gained about visual unique principles, and drafts is going to be due in after days.
On Wee k 5 -Day 2, we shall do a discourse analysis on Logos/Pathos/Ethos as previously
described. An even more certain task with this time regarding Logos, Pathos, and Ethos will likely be the
introduction of what the Rhetorical Triangle is to pupils in the whiteboard with examples.
Then, to look deeper at Logos, Pathos, and Ethos, i am going to connect students to an editorial or opinion
section of a newspaper either on the web or give physical copies, with respect to the class room and
student resources. I will keep these things search for examples of Logos, Pathos, and Ethos in pairs. We will
then have pupils show the course a few of the arguments made with a projector display, as well
as just how those arguments match several areas of the triangle. Finally, i am going to give a very brief
introduction towards novel they are going to learn as an example for the genre of text narration: A Long
Way Gone.
Week 6. In Week 6, we shall begin APA citation exploration, explore narratives, start
literature sectors with narratives, and do peer reviews. On day 1, i shall give a s mall presentation
on plagiarism and significance of citation, an integral part of Ethos, before beginning to instruct about how
to utilize APA citation structure. I'll begin by describing major options that come with in text citation, such as
inclusion of author and date, signal expressions, etc., and then students will exercise including citation
to paragraphs predicated on information I give them. Students will likely then obtain the opportunity to work in
pairs to examine their “just how to Books”. Pupils will simply be centered on content this very day, unless
grammar int erferes with comprehension. I shall provide them with peer review worksheets to steer them
and help ensure that their lovers are actually giving advice. On Day 2, I will introduce
narrative texts just like I did with visual novels with exploration of varied examp les. We are going to do
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
42
literature groups for a considerable ways Gone, but alternatively of visual novel features, one of many roles
will be specific to narrative features. We will never be readin g the complete novel, but alternatively three
selected chunks, due to time. It really is my objective th at students will enjoy it sufficient to continue on their
own during or after the semester. Finally, pupils gets the opportunity to do another peer review
on Essay 1 (the “How To Book”), in this draft, they are going to focus more on smaller, area level
errors like grammar and spelling as it will undoubtedly be due within the after class duration.
Week 7. Week 7 includes more conversation of A Long Way experienced literature
circles and research of narratives on Day 1. Because of this day, pupils may have read more about
text narratives from their class text, The Norton Sampler: brief Essays of Composition (8th ed)
by Thomas Cooley (2013). This text will likely be extremely good for the pupils in figuring out
specifics of latter three of this major program genres in addition to be a source of genre
examples. Cooley’s (2013) text follows a rather routine pattern for every single genre. He describes what
the genre is and poss ible steps/ useful tips for writing into the genre. Then, he gives numerous
and varied essay examples to assist students in determining the genre and writing their own take
on it. With this time and through the remaining portion of the semester, pupils will talk about the essays and
genre features in class by using this text as the major source of information. For example, on
this day we shall talk about the features of a narrative that Cooley (2013) writes about, and we
will examine how those features appeared in the nar rative novel. Day 2 is going to be discourse
analysis of Genre particular Vocabulary and phrase structures used in the novel.
Week 8. Week 8 will involve the 3rd and final literary works circle day of the text narrative
reading, also introduction to and course time taking care of the next essay. This project,
Writing a Narrative, is going to be introduced on Day 1. I'll provide students three sections from each of
their visual novels that i do believe are significant and rich in content. Students will have to choose
one associated with the parts and re -write the tale utilizing prose. Put another way, they've to describe
what happens in the visual novel pictures and discussion, using only terms without their
accompanying pictures. We'll discuss in class feasible ways to go about writing this essay.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
43
Then, on Day 2, I will give students real work time on essay, therefore I can give help and
check through to how the pupils are doing.
Week 9. Students can do peer summary of Essay 2 -Writi ng a Narrative, discourse analysis,
and begin product 3, definition of a Process. The major distinction between this discourse
analysis and past discourse analyses is that students are using “ Puttin’ all of it Together ”
on Day 1. By this, i am talking about pupils will practice discourse analysis utilizing all the features we
have talked about: function, company, vocabulary, and soci al context s. They are going to probably have
done this making use of their major genres implicitly, however they will now get the chance to do more explicit
dis course analysis of varied texts. On Day 2, we'll talk about just what the Descrip tion of a Process
Genre is through a reading from their Cooley (2013) textbook and talk about those features in
regards towards test essay, “How Boys get Men” by Jon Katz (2013).
Week 10. During the period of Week 10, students will exercise actions for Describing a
Process making use of both pictures and prose. On Day 1, they'll brainstorm 2 -3 processes that they
would like to explain. They'll then practice writing out steps for many proces ses before
working with someone who will critique and provide advice in regards to the steps offered. Including,
they might provide advice on steps they thought were confusing, in which they might add more steps,
etc. On the overnight, pupils will generate pictures to matc h the procedures they created. Last but not least,
students can get the chance to combine pictures and steps together in a functional process.
Week 11. Students are certain to get more hours focusing on Description of a Process and
additional Puttin’ it All Together discourse analy sis training. On Day 1, pupils will determine a
topic for his or her third essay, definition of an activity, and we will focus on possible sentence
frames the genre by completing frame blanks when it comes to their practice subjects from Week 10.
The composing ass ignment would be introduced; the assignment requires students to create a string of
steps which will add both images and prose. Cooley (2013) defines two types of processes
about which pupils can decide to compose: “directive ” and “explanatory ”: “d irect ive ” explains
“how to accomplish something”, particularly how to drive a bike, while “explanatory ” details “how something
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
44
works” like how the bike remains up (292). Students should be able to choose a kind of process,
and they'll incorporate pictures, utilizing skills learne d with all the past two essay genres and in
analysis of description process writing examples. Like, they will take whatever they learned
about images and prose and combine them together, include ing even more narrative like composing to
their essays to flesh o ut the procedures more. E xamples with this design have been in the Cooley (2013)
Description of a Process essays. Lastly, students gets some work time on the essays on
Day 2.
Week 12. pupils does peer reviews regarding Description of Process essays, as well as
review citation before going on the 4th and last product. Along with review on Day 1, we
will review citation format because students will be required to put it to use in their final genre essay.
On Time 2, in addition to a later date of peer review, stu dents will undoubtedly be introduced towards the Argument
Rationale Genre through practices formerly talked about.
Week 13. On Week 13 -Day 1, students can not only review Logos, Pathos, and Ethos in
preparation the last essay, however they also exercise supplying ratio nale and arguments for
one associated with 2-3 Description of a procedure subjects brainstormed in Week 10. On Day 2, we
will review the graphic and narrative novels read, in groups so that as a whole class, because
students will likely to be using content from their readin gs inside their final essay -Argument Rationale, which
is additionally introduced today. Pupils will likely be using Logos, Pathos, and Ethos to argue the
reasoning behind actions taken or viewpoints expressed by a character inside visual novel or
narrative. For instance, the y might argue that Bao from Boxers graphic novel ended up being justified in
fighting against Christian development in Asia due to traditional heritage, violence from
Christians, and not enough opportunities. Or, pupils could argue that Bao’s thinking had been flawed
because he created a lot more physical violence and he himself ended up being an oppressor. Students could also
create an argument about why Ishmael became a kid soldier in quite a distance Gone. This final
essay assignment will enable me personally to evaluate students’ power to use textual help to justify
actions inside genres we now have read.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
45
Week 14. Week 14 can give pupils work time on their last essay as the end of the
semester is a busy time, initial peer review the essay, and a final Puttin’ it All Together
discourse a nalysis, in order to keep it fresh in pupils’ heads and give them more training of
techniques and design usable because of their essays.
Week 15. Students will peer review and work with their essays, and Day 2 should include a
class expression and a celebration. In the inside class representation, students will be able to think and write
critically in regards to the challenges and successes of reading and writing within the various genres, what
they’ve learned, just what questions they nevertheless have actually towards genres, that which was interesting or not
abo ut writing inside genres, etc. This may allow them to give some thought to whatever they have learned,
although we are going to also explore just what pupils composed about in general group. After that, there is
nothing kept to do but have a celebration and enjoy each other’s business at the end of another
semester.
Evaluation
This section details just how pupil work are going to be evaluat ed within the Genre research course.
It answers the question, “just how can I evaluate what pupils have discovered?” (Graves, 1996, p. 30).
This part may be divid ed into two sections: (1) Formative Assessments, and (2) Summative
Assessments.
Formative Assessments
In this section, I will explain some situations of formative assessments for my course.
Formative assessments are those used to check out a daily foundation on what students are
learning, what progress these are typically making, and if I am succeeding in teaching the information
(Wiggins & McTighe, 2006). Formative assessments aren't constantly graded; rather, they allow
the instructor to see what pupils still have to accom plish so that you can meet up with the course results.
Discourse Analysis. There are lots of formative assessments which can be particularly
involved utilizing the Critical Genre discourse analysis abilities learned in course. For example, during
group or set work, i'll be walk ing around, listening and chatting with students to understand
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
46
what kinds of questions they will have and whatever they notice concerning the genres they truly are analyzing.
This is likely to be specially important once I have review days (Puttin’ all of it Together), particularly at
the end of semester. This will permit me to observe much information pupils have actually retained
and learned from all work they put into the class. Then, we shall end each day’s discussion as
a entire group make it possible for me to comprehend exactly what the group has lear ned. Finally is student
Peer Reviews. This will be a time for me to walk around to see just what pupils will work on,
as well a s what they notice about their peers’ documents. Basically notice habits which can be common
across my students, i'll address them wi th the class as a whole. Otherwise, i am going to talk with
individual students while they are working.
Literature circle functions. The literary works group roles enable another sort of formative
assessment which will help me determine exactly what struggles my students are h aving. After class on
days once we are discussing the literary works, i am going to collect the records students took while reading
and in their discussion teams to higher comprehend their comprehension, along with the novels
as a whole. If I notice anything lacking i n the very first few weeks, I am able to address the difficulties with
the students.
Worktime. Because my program is very exploratory, I integrated lots of work time for my
students. W ith simply the four major genres and genre discourse analysis skill building times, there
wi ll additionally be entire days focused on student essays and tasks. This allows pupils to ask
me and their peers for assistance, and permits me personally to get a review of just what students work on before
their final products are due. Thus giving me personally to be able to help pupil s with one thing before it
becomes an entrenched problem inside their project.
Homework. Lastly, pupils can get smaller assignments and readings that may help
prepare them for course or exercise the skills discovered in course. A few examples might include
readi ngs to prepare them for a crucial genre discourse analysis times, Cooley (2013) readings,
practice associated with genre analysis abilities discovered, citation practice, exploration of genres, etc. These,
like all formative assessments, assist me discover how to enhance the class.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
47
Summative Assessments
In this area, i am going to describe the main summative evaluation essay s, and provide the
rubrics regularly evaluate them. The rubrics are modified from Atterberry, Bonnac, and Langin at
MELP. Summative assessments are the ones always test just what a student has learned for a unit or
class, and include such evaluation as exams, presentations, performances, essays, etc. The
major assessments for this course will be the four multi -draft essays formerly described.
exactly how to guide. Table 3 below shows the rubric of this students’ first major summative
assessment, the “How to Book ” for visual novels.
Table 3: How to Book Rubric
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Introduction The introduction
creates strong
interest and moves
coherently from a
general to
narrowed focus.
The introduction
creates some interest
and moves from a
general to narrowed
focus.
The attention getter
is dull and also the move
from a general to
narrowed focus is
confusing or too
brief.
There i s no attention
getter and the
introduction does
not move from a
general to narrowed
focus.
Thesis
statement
The thesis
statement clearly
tells the reader the
topic and specific
main notion of the
essay.
The thesis statement
tells your reader the
topic and main idea
of the essay in a
general way.
The topic and main
idea of the essay
have to be inferred
from the thesis
statement
The thesis statement
is vague or unclear,
Topic
sentences
All subject sentences
have a very cle ar
controlling concept that
relates straight to
the thesis
statement.
All subject sentences
have a fairly clear
controlling concept and
at minimum 2 topic
sentences relate
directly on thesis
statement.
Some topic sentences
(1 or 2) would not have a
clear controllin g idea
and/or some topic
sentences (1 or 2) do
not relate directly to
the thesis statement.
More than 2 topic
sentences do not
have a clear
controlling idea
and/or significantly more than 2
do maybe not relate directly
to the thesis
statement.
Development
–uses
All human anatomy paragraphs
include extensive
All human body paragraphs
include adequate
At minimum 1 body
paragraph lacks
At least 2 body
paragraphs lack
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
48
extensive
exa mples
support of the
graphic novel
features into the form
of extended
examples that are
fair and complete.
support of the
graphic novel
features inside form
of extended
examples that are
fair and complete.
adequate support of
graphic novel
features inside form
of extended
examples that are
fair and complete.
adequate help of
graphic novel
features in the form
of extend ed
examples that are
fair and complete.
Development

demonstrates
critical
thinking and
awareness of
the graphic
novel genre
The writer
demonstrates
superior critical
thinking by
communicating
sophisticated,
extensively
developed ideas
that reveal
knowledge about
the graphic novel
and its vocabulary
The writer
demonstrates critical
thinking by
communicating clear,
adequately
developed tips that
provide a general
response about the
graphic novel and its
vocabulary
The writer
demonstrates critical
thinking with clear,
adequately
developed a few ideas but
does not adequately
respond about the
graphic novel and its
vocabulary
The writer fails to
communicate ideas
clearly and does
not react about
the graphic novel and
its vocabulary
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Coherence The essay as a
whole is arranged
logically; each
paragraph is
arranged logically;
the journalist combines
clauses and uses
transitions
effectively and
accurately to
connect ideas.
The essay as a whole
is arranged logically;
most paragraphs are
arranged logically;
the author sometimes
combines clautilizes
and uses some
transitions to
connect ideas,
though perhaps not always
accurately.
The essay as a whole
is arranged
somewhat logically;
few paragraphs are
arranged log ically;
the writing lacks
accurate use of
combined clauses
and transitions.
The overall
organization lacks
logic; most
paragraphs are not
arranged logically;
and the author rarely
or doesn’t combine
clauses or use
transitions to
connect ideas.
Unity and
coherence w/
paragraphs
All supporting
sentences relate to
the subject sentence
in all paragraphs.
All supporting
sentences relate to
the subject sentence in
most paragraphs.
Some sentences do
not relate with the topic
sentence in 2 or
more paragraphs.
Many sentences do
not relate with the topic
sentence in 2 or
more paragraphs.
Conclusion The conclusion
clearly summarizes
the details
(subtopics) of the
essay and/or
restates the thesis
The conclusion
summarizes the main
points (subtopics) of
the essay and/or
restates the thesis in
different terms, but
The primary points
and/or thesis are
restated utilizing the
same or really similar
language like in the
introduction. The
The main points or
thesis are not
restated. The
conclusion is not
related toward essay.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
49
in different words.
The conclusion does
not mention any
new tips.
the conclusion brings
up new ideas.
conclusion brings up
new tips.
Format
Requirement
s (1 or 0
points)
X X X Essay meets
required length;
Essay is formatted
correctly with 1”
margins, 12 pt font,
and name and
assignment
information in
upper left.
Evidence of
Writing
Process
(1 or 0
points)
X X X All parts of writing
process are turned
in on time
(past drafts,
peer review, self —
evaluation,
instructor
feedback).
Modified From Sp15 Atterberry / Bonnac / Langin
Rubric: Narrative. Dining table 4 below describes the rubric associated with the pupils’ 2nd major,
summative assessment, the Narrative.
Table 4: Narrative Rubric
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Content All appropriate
content is
extensively included;
no major plot points
are excluded
Most appropriate
content is
extensively included;
some major plot
points are excluded
Much appropriate
content is
extensively included;
Many major plot
points are excluded
Appro priate content
and plot points are
not included
Developmen
t –
demonstrate
s critical
The writer
demonstrates
superior critical
thinking and
The writer
demonstrates critical
thinking and
creativity by
The writer
demonstrates critical
thinking and
creativity with clear,
The author fails to
communicate prose
clearly and / or does
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
50
thinking and
creativity
creativity by
communicating
sophisticated,
extensively
developed prose that
provide a direct
response to the
prompt.
communicating clear,
adequately
developed prose that
provide a general
response to the
prompt.
adequate ly
developed prose but
does maybe not adequately
respond to the
prompt.
not react to the
prompt.
Coherence This content as a
whole is arranged
logically; each
paragraph is
arranged logically;
the writ er combines
clauses and uses
transitions
effectively and
accurately to connect
ideas.
The content as a
whole is arranged
logically; most
paragraphs are
arranged logically;
the author sometimes
combines clamakes use of
and uses some
transitions to
connect tips,
though not always
accurately.
The content as a
whole is arranged
somewhat logically;
few paragraphs are
arranged logically;
the composing lacks
accurate use of
combined clauses
and transitions.
The overall
organization lacks
logic; most
paragraphs are not
arranged logically;
and the journalist rarely
or doesn’t combine
clauses or use
transitions to
connect some ideas.
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Dialogue
and
Thoughts
All appropriate
dialogue and
thoughts are
extensively included;
Use diverse and
accurately formed
signal phrases
Most appropriate
dialogue and
thoughts are
included; Use mostly
varied and accurately
formed signal
phrases
Some appropriate
dialogue and
thoughts are
included; utilize some
varied and accurately
formed signal
phrases
Dialogue and
Thoughts no
appropriately
included; Doesn’t use
signal phrases
Action and
Descriptions
All necessary
character action and
character/scenery
descriptions are
extensively included
Most necessary
character action and
character/scenery
descriptions are are
included
Some necessary
character action and
character/scenery
descriptions are
included
Little to no
necessary character
action and
character/scenery
descriptions are
included
Format
Requiremen
ts (1 or 0
points)
X X X Essay meets
required length;
Essay is formatted
correctly with 1”
margins, 12 pt font,
and name and
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
51
assignment
information in
upper left.
Evidence of
Writing
Process
(1 or 0
points)
X X X All elements of writing
process are turned
in on time
(previous drafts,
peer review, self —
evaluation,
instructor
feedback).
Modified From Sp15 Atterberry / Bonnac / Langin
Rubric: Description of a Process. Dining table 5 below shows the rubric of the students’ third
major, summative evaluation, Description of a Process.
Table 5: Descrip tion of a Process
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Introduction The introduction
creates strong
interest and moves
coherently from a
general to narrowed
focus; and/or clearly
follows organization
of certain genre
The introduction
creates some interest
and moves from a
general to narrowed
focus; and/or
adequately follows
organization of
specific genre
The attention getter
is dull while the move
from a general to
narrowed focus is
confusing or too
brief; and/or
somewhat follows
organ ization of
specific genre
There is not any attention
getter and the
introduction does
not move from a
general to narrowed
focus; and/or doesn’t
follow organization
of certain genre
Thesis
statement
The thesis statement
clearly informs the
reader this issue and
specific primary concept of
the essay.
The thesis statement
tells your reader the
topic and main idea
of the essay in a
general means.
The subject and main
idea for the essay
have to be inferred
from t he thesis
statement
The thesis statement
is obscure or unclear,
Topic
sentences
All subject sentences
have a very clear
controlling concept that
relates straight to the
thesis statement
All topic sentences
have a fairly clear
controlling idea and
at minimum 2 to pic
sentences relate
directly to the thesis
statement
Some subject sentences
(1 or 2) don't have a
clear controlling idea
and/or some topic
sentences (one or two) do
not relate directly to
the thesis statement
More than 2 topic
sentences do not
have a clear
controlling idea
and/or above 2
do perhaps not relate directly
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
52
to the thesis
statement
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Coherence The pictures and
prose are arranged
extensively and
logically together;
reveals extensive
knowledge of just how to
sequence steps
Most of images
and prose are
arranged logically
together; reveals
basic knowledge of
how to sequence
steps
Few images and
prose are arranged
logically together;
reveals shortage of
knowledge of just how to
sequence steps
Incoherent
organization of
images and prose.
Reveals small to no
knowledge of just how to
sequence steps
Unity and
coherence
w/
paragraphs
All supporting
sentences relate to
the subject phrase in
all paragraphs.
All supporting
sentences relate to
the topic sentence in
most paragraphs.
Some sentences do
not relate genuinely to the topic
sentence in 2 or
more paragraphs.
Many sentences do
not connect with the topic
sentence in 2 or
more paragraphs.
Conclusion The conclusion
clearly summarizes
the details
(subtopics) of the
essay a nd/or
restates the thesis in
different terms. The
conclusion does not
bring up any new
ideas; and/or
extensively follows
conclusion design of
the genre
The conclusion
summarizes the main
points (subtopics) of
the essay and/or
restates the thesis in
differen t words, but
the conclusion brings
up new a few ideas;
and/or adequately
follows conclusion
style associated with the genre
The main points
and/or thesis are
restated making use of the
same or very similar
language as in the
introduction. The
conclusion brings up
new some ideas; and/or
somewhat follows
conclusion design of
the genre
The main points or
thesis are not
restated. The
conclusion is not
related towards essay;
and/or does not
follow conclusion
style associated with the genre
Format
Requiremen
ts (1 or 0
points)
X X X Essay meets
required length;
Essay is formatted
correctly with 1”
margins, 12 pt font,
and name and
assignment
information in
upper left.
Evidence of
Writing
Process
X X X All parts of writing
process are turned
in on time
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
53
(1 or 0
points)
(past drafts,
peer review, self —
evaluation,
instructor
feedback).
Modified From Sp15 Atterberry / Bonnac / Langin
Rubric: Argument Rationale. Table 6 below offers the rubric regarding the pupils’ fourth
major, summative assessment, Argument Rationale.
Table 6: Argument Rationale Rubric
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Introduction The introduction
creates strong
interest and moves
coherently from a
general to narrowed
focus; and/or clearly
follows organization
of certain genre
The introduction
creates some interest
and techniques from a
general to narrowed
focus; and/or
adequately follows
organization of
specific genre
The attention getter
is dull plus the move
from a general to
narrowed focus is
confusing or too
brief; and/or
somewhat follows
organization of
specific genre
There isn't any attention
getter and the
introduction does
not go from a
general to narrowed
focus; and/or doesn’t
follow organization
of specific genre
Thesis
statement
The thesis statement
clearly informs the
reader th age topic and
specific primary concept of
the essay.
The thesis statement
tells the reader the
topic and main idea
of the essay in a
general method.
The topic and main
idea associated with the essay
have become inferred
from the thesis
statement
The thesis statement
is vague or unclear,
Topic
sentences
All subject sentences
have a very clear
controlling idea that
relates directly to the
thesis statement
All subject sentences
have a fairly clear
controlling idea and
at least 2 topic
sentences relate
directly towards the thesis
statement.
Some topic sentences
(a few) would not have a
clear managing idea
and/or some topic
sentences (1 or 2) do
not relate straight to
the thesis statement
More than 2 topic
sentences do not
have a clear
controlling idea
and/ or even more than 2
do maybe not relate directly
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
54
to the thesis
statement.
Developmen
t –uses
extensive
examples
All human anatomy paragraphs
include extensive
support of the
controlling idea in
the as a type of extended
examples that are
fair and complete;
extensively mirrors
styl e of particular genre
All human anatomy paragraphs
include adequate
support of the
controlling idea in
the form of extended
examples that are
fair and complete;
adequately mirrors
style of specific
genre.
At least 1 body
paragraph lacks
adequate help of
the contr olling idea
in the proper execution of
extended exampl es
that are reasonable and
complete; somewhat
mirrors style of
specific genre.
At least 2 body
paragraphs lack
adequate support of
the managing idea
in the proper execution of
extended examples
that are fai r and
complete; does no t
mirror design of
specific genre.
Developmen
t –
demonstrate
s critical
thinking
The writer
demonstrates
superior critical
thinking by
communicating
sophisticated,
extensively
developed ideas that
provide a direct
response to the
prompt.
The writer
demonstra tes critical
thinking by
communicating clear,
adequately
developed some ideas that
provide a general
response to the
prompt.
The writer
demonstrates critical
thinking with clear,
adequately
developed a few ideas but
does not adequately
respond to the
prompt.
The writ er fails to
communicate ideas
clearly and / or does
not answer the
prompt.
Superior (4) Adequate (3) Developing (2) Struggling (1)
Coherence The essay as a whole
is arranged logically;
each paragraph is
arranged logically;
the journalist combines
clauses and uses
transitions
effectively and
accurately to connect
ideas.
The essay as a whole
is arranged logically;
most paragraphs are
arranged logic ally;
the author sometimes
combines clauses
and uses some
transitions to
connect ideas,
though maybe not always
accurately.
The essay as a whole
is arranged
somewhat logically;
few paragraphs are
arranged logically;
the writing lacks
accurate usage of
combined cla uses
and transitions.
The overall
organization lacks
logic; most
paragraphs are not
arranged logically;
and the author rarely
or doesn’t combine
clauses or use
transitions to
connect ideas.
Unity and
coherence
w/
paragraphs
All supporting
sentences relat e to
the topic phrase in
all paragraphs.
All supporting
sentences relate to
the subject sentence in
most paragraphs.
Some sentences do
not relate genuinely to the topic
sentence in 2 or
more paragraphs.
Many sentences do
not relate with the topic
sentence in 2 or
more paragraphs.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
55
Conclusion The conclusion
clearly summarizes
the details
(subtopics) of the
essay and/or
restates the thesis in
different terms. The
conclusion does not
bring up any new
ideas; and/or
extensively follows
conclusion style of
genre
The conc lusion
summarizes the main
points (subtopics) of
the essay and/or
restates the thesis in
different words, but
the summary brings
up brand new a few ideas;
and/or adequately
follows conclusion
style of genre
The main points
and/or thesis are
restated using the
same or extremely similar
language as in the
introduction. The
conclusion brings up
new tips; and/or
somewhat follows
conclusion design of
genre
The main points or
thesis are not
restated. The
conclusion is not
related to the essay;
and/or does not
follow conclusion
style of genre
APA Citation
Format
The in text citations
accurately follow
correct APA format;
the guide page
contains no errors
The in text citations
accurately follow
correct APA format
with some mistakes; the
reference page
contains a few errors
The in text citations
contain many APA
format mistakes; the
reference page
contains numerous errors
There are no in text
citations; there is no
reference page
Format
Requiremen
ts (1 or 0
points)
X X X Essay meets
required length;
Essay is formatted
corr ectly with 1”
margins, 12 pt font,
and title and
assignment
information in
upper left.
Evidence of
Writing
Process
(1 or 0
points)
X X X All elements of writing
process are turned
in on time
(previous drafts,
peer review, self —
evaluation,
instructor
feedback).
Modified From Sp15 Atterberry / Bonnac / Langin
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
56
Conclusion
In this paper I detail the creation of a course in Genre research which targets four
major genres: graphic novels, narratives, description of a process, and argument rationale. The
purpose with this course is to teach pupils to critically evaluate and produce these texts, among
others, utilizing discourse analysis in order to prepare on their own for the rigors of reading and
writing in academia. I first described the specific learners tar geted by the course and what
knowledg e space it fills. Then, I outlined exactly what certain learning objectives are required to meet
student requirements. After, I sequenced the product within the course and explained exactly what materials are
used. Upcoming, I describe more in -depth your day -to-day work. Finally, we explai n the assessment
procedures and provided evaluative rubrics the major assessments. The creation of a training course,
however, isn't a static procedure which includes a clearly defined end. Rather, it is an ever evolving
procedure, an d the next thing is to show the program, revise it once more, after which repeat indefinitely.
Only in this manner will I consistently develop as an instructor and supply the best instruction for my
students.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
57
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Appendix A
This syllabus is modified from syllabi found in MELP.
Spring 2016
Course Number: ESL 950 teacher: Samuel (Sam) Reid
Sections: 001 e-mail: [email protected]
Location: TBD workplace: TBD
Days: Tu esday/Thursday workplace Hrs.: Wednesday
Time: 10:05 a.m. – 11:50 a.m. (10:10 -11:30 am) or by appointment
Course Description
This course helps student s be a little more aware of genre to enhance their capability to dissect a text
and prepare them the challenges of learning genre in academia. The main focus is on offering students text
analysis skills to be able to better prepare for the educational classroom. Topics include checking out genre
through the visual novel, narrative, description of an activity, and argument rational, also critically
analyzing genre, exploring and composing familiar and unknown genres, composing in genres, and more. This
knowledge i s applied to class conversations, discourse analysis, and reading and writing jobs. Students
will gain self-confidence about going into the world of academia, particular for their unique passions and goals.
Learning Outcomes
Upon effective conclusion of the co urse, pupils will demonstrate proficiency in using the next:
● Analytical knowing of specific genres:
○ Graphic Novels
○ Text Narratives
○ Description of a Process
○ Argument Rationale
● Text Organization and Flow
○ Critically evaluate text for company and flow using discourse analysis
○ know main tips and distinguish them in writing or discussion
○ Write multi -paragraph essays with coherent organization
○ Write multi -paragraph essays with a clear thesis statement
○ Write successful introductions and conclusi ons
● Critical Thinking
○ Cri tically analyze social context s of a text making use of discourse analysis
○ Recognize Logos/Pathos/Ethos in a text making use of discourse analysis
○ Create critical reactions to reading
○ Write multi -paragraph essays with logos/pathos/ethos and consideration of audience
● Genre certain Vocabulary and Sentence Frames
○ Recognize and understand how genre certain language and groups of words (sentence
frames) are associated with purpose utilizing critical discourse analysis
○ Identify important words in reading
○ Evaluate particular term alternatives used by an author
○ Write multi -paragraph essays utilizing genre particular vocabulary
● Process Writing
○ Use the writing procedure, including
Drafts
Peer Reviews
Revision
Required Materials
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
62
● needed Textbook: Thomas Cooley’s Norton Sam pler: brief Essays for Composition EITHER
(1) Gene Luen Yang’s Boxers, or (2) Gene Luen Yang’s Saints. You will be assigned your text by
Sam in advance.
● Technology: You will sometimes should be in a position to access some type of computer with headphones, a
microphone, and a webcam. If you don't have these things, you'll complete your assignments
in the Language Center Multimedia Lab in Jones 135 or into the SMART training Commons in
Walter Library.
● Data Storage: You will need a flash drive device or space somewhere to truly save electronic work.
● Organization: Please bring a folder in which you'll keep program handouts and a notebook in
which you'll make notes to course everyday.
Grading Information and Policies
Final grades will be based regarding the following elements:
1. Just how to Book Essay 20%
2. Narrative Essay 20%
4. Description of an activity Essay 20%
3. Argument Rationale Essay 20%
4. Daily Homework Assignments 20%
TOTAL: 100per cent
As a student in the MELP, you will be assigned a grade in accordance with an S/N (satisfactory / not
satisfactory) grading foundation. An S grade means you pass the course and an N grade means you fail. You
must have a complete final grade above 70% for an S and t ake Academic Grammar next semester.
Your grade in MELP classes becomes element of your permanent record as a student and may affect your
movement to an increased degree in MELP plus your admission to the U of MN as well as other colleges or
universities. Note: Effort and work are important, but students must show which they have
accomplished the class objectives and acquired the required skills to be able to pass this program.
The chart below shows just how your current percentage corresponds to S or N. it shows just how your
overall percentage corresponds to your A – F grading system, but keep in mind that just S or N are possible
final grades inside program.
S = Satisfactory N = Not
Satisfactory
A
94
to100%
of points
A-
90 to 93%
of points
B+
87 to
89per cent
of
points
B
83 to
86per cent of
points
B-
80 to
82% of
points
C+
77 to
79%
of
points
C
73 to
76percent
of
points
C-
70 to
72%
of
points
D+
67 to
69% of
points
D
63 to
66% of
points
Represents
achievement that is
outstanding general to
the degree necessary to
meet course
requirements
Represents achievement
that is considerably above
the degree essential to meet
course requirements
Represents achievement
that satisfies the course
requirements in every
respect
Represents some
achievement but
not s ufficient to
pass the course
Evaluation of Assignments and Tests:
GENRE RESEARCH COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
63
● Essays: You will definitely finish four, multi -draft essays to show your knowledge of
and power to apply course concepts to written genres.
● Research assignments: You will complete regular research projects based on
daily tasks and learning into the classroom.
Homework Guidelines
At an American university, pupils are expected to complete focus on their very own outside class.
Homework includes assignments given by instructors and daily overview of course product.
research could be graded or not graded.
A typical university class within University of Minnesota calls for students to accomplish typically 2 hours
of homework for each and every 60 minutes in course. U. of M. students whom take on average 12 credits per
semester can expect to invest 12 hours per week in course and approximately twenty four hours per week on homework
and projects to pass the class (C — or better). Pupils could need to do more outside course to achiev e
an A or a B.
In the Minnesota English Language Program, research is equally important. Language practice outside
of course is necessary to improve English proficiency. For students who would like to study at an American
university, finishing daily homewo rk is also necessary to adapt to the high objectives of college
classes.
Full -time MELP pupils that taking classes 20 -25 hours each week should expect to finish an
average of 3 hours of homework everyday or on average 21 hours weekly to make pro gress in English.
Students that are advanced level for their level might need less time for you to finish their homework, and students
who are low because of their level might need more time.
Late Assignments
Students must request authorization to make in an assignment later on or prior to the day the assignment is
due. The grade on a late assignment won't be reduced in the event that work is turned in late because of a
reason which defined by the University of Minnesota as legitimate, including disease, loss of a
family user, parti cipation in intercollegiate athletic activities, and religious observances. However,
i might need evidence that the explanation you are asking to turn into the work late is genuine. If the reason
you desire to submit an assignment late isn't considered legitimate as defined by the University of
Minnesota, you might or cannot get authorization to show the project in belated. If you should be given
permission to turn in an assignment later, i am going to set a new due date for submiting the project and
may reduce your last gr ade regarding the assignment by 10% for each day it really is late at night original due
date. No late assignments would be accepted unless you request permission to make in work late
on or before the deadline, regardless of the basis for submiting the assignmen t belated.
Missed Tests and Quizzes
Tests and quizzes may only be comprised as long as you contact me on or before the time your test is given
and ask for permission to produce up the test. I shall allow you to make-up the test for reasons defined by the
Universi ty of Minnesota as genuine, including disease, death of a family member, participation in
intercollegiate athletic activities, and spiritual observances. However, i might need proof your reason
that you missed the test is genuine. Your grade on t he make -up test are paid off by as much as 20% if
your reason isn't determined become genuine. Make -up tests will likely be equivalent to the original test but
may contain various questions or take another structure. Unless its an urgent situation, you can't ma ke
up a test should you not contact me on or before the date associated with test in regards to the cause for your lack, even
if your explanation is legitimate.
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
64
Extra Credit
Extra credit possibilities may occasionally be around by means of additional concerns on tests, sm all
extra assignments, or information supplied throughout the first couple of minutes of class. These bonus learning
opportunities won't have a substantial effect on your final grade and will also be similarly available to all
students.
Attendance Policies
● Attendance i s very important because countless learning occurs in classroom and because
attendance is a requirement for the pupil visa.
● If you arrive later, leave early, or are asleep throughout the course, you will be marked absent.
Attendance is dependant on each h our of course. Each hour of class equals 50 moments or two 25 —
minute durations. If you should be missing for any section of a 25 -minute period, you will end up counted absent
for that period.
● Program certificates of attendance are only awarded to pupils whom attend 90 per cent or more in each
of their courses. You'll not receive a certificate of attendance from MELP in case your attendance is
below 90percent for the course hours in almost any MELP course.
● If your attendance is below 90%, your last or overall grade would be paid down proportionate to your
absences. Like, if you attend only 85% regarding the classes, your grade is paid down by 15%
and you might not pass the class.
End of semester
course grade
Final
attendance
Penalty Final course grade
85percent 80per cent 100 – 80 = 20 85 – 20 = 65per cent maybe not Satisfactory
85per cent 90percent No penalty 85 – 0 = 85percent Satisfactory
● the sole excused absences are for recognized University of Minnesota religious holiday breaks. If you
will be observing a religious getaway, you need to notify me beforehand and I will let you know
whether the absence is excused by the University. Just like other absences, you still need doing the
work you missed if you are absent on a religious holiday.
● It's YOUR obligation to find out that which we did on on a daily basis you were a bsent and hand in
assignments which were collected on that time. Check out the Moodle site or contact a classmate or me
to find out what you missed. You're likely to be ready for another course when you are
absent.
English -Only Classroom
In order to improve your English, you need to exercise talking English. For that reason, this classroom
will be an English -only zone.
Student Academic Honesty and Plagiarism
As a University of Minnesota student, you might be anticipated to comprehend and stick to the guideline s of academic
honesty. Among other activities, which means you have to do your own personal work and you mustn't use
information from a source if you don't identify the source and quote or paraphrase properly. It’s not
always simple to understand what is considered hones t and what exactly is not. The University of Minnesota considers
these tasks dishonest:
● copying a classmate’s work with a homework project or test
● plagiarizing (using somebody else’s words/work without showing who had written it and where you
found it)
● cheating on studies done by sharing answers, talking to classmates, or using materials without permission
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
65
The following excerpt is from the University of Minnesota scholar Conduct Code. It outlines the
expectations the University has regarding plagiarism.
Plagiarism mea ns representing what, imaginative work, or tips of some other individual as one’s own
without supplying appropriate paperwork of source. These include, but are not limited to:
● Copying information word after word from a source without the need for quote markings and giving
proper acknowledgement through footnote, endnote, or in -text citation;
● Representing the words, tips, or information of some other person as one’s own without providing
proper attribution on author through quote, reference, in -text citation, or fo otnote;
● Producing, without the right attribution, any style of work originated by another person such as
a musical phrase, a proof, a speech, an image, experimental information, laboratory report, graphic
design, or computer code;
● Paraphrasing, without enough a cknowledgment, ideas extracted from another person that the
reader might fairly mistake as being the author’s; and
● Borrowing different terms, tips, expressions, or data from original sources and mixing them
with one’s very own without acknowledging the sources.
It may be the duty of all students to know the requirements and ways of proper attribution and to
clarify with every teacher the standards, objectives, and guide strategies appropriate to the
subject area and course requirements, including gro up work and internet use. Students are motivated to
seek out information regarding these procedures from trainers along with other resources and also to use this
information in all submissions of educational work.
To improve your English and demonstrate educational honesty, focus on utilizing your OWN terms and
language in most projects. You'll find the University of Minnesota’s definition of plagiarism at the
site associated with the Center for Writing: http://writ ing.umn.edu/tww/plagiarism/definitions.html. After that you
can follow links to sites that assist you to figure out how to avoid plagiarism.
Consequences of Academic Dishonesty
Students that caught plagiarizing or cheating wont get credit and certainly will not ha ve an opportunity
to constitute the work. Students who're caught cheating or plagiarizing an extra time will fail the program.
In addition, situations of scholastic dishonesty will likely to be reported to your workplace for Student Conduct and
Academic Integrity using the foll owing kind:
http://www1.umn.edu/oscai/integrity/faculty/dishonesty_report.pdf
Please read the frequently asked questions on the after internet site to help you realize plagiarism
and its effects. http://www1.umn.edu/oscai/integrity/student/index.html Always ask if you have
questions or issues about academic honesty.
University of Minnesota Policies
The University of Minnesota has rules for trainers and pupils to aid training and learning, and
the Minnesota English Language Program follow s these rules. You'll find a list of these rules regarding U.
of M.’s webpage as well as in the MELP Student Handbook: https://ay13.moodle.umn.edu/
course/view.php?id=7205. When you have any concerns or concerns about these issues, please keep in touch with your
instructor.
The U of M has rules for
● pupil dishonesty and behavior
● pupil learning responsibilities
● creating missed work
● grade definitions
● intimate harassment
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
66
● respecting diversity
● accommodating disabilities
● mental health and anxiety administration
● scholastic freedom and responsibility
See http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Education/Educ ation/SYLLABUSREQUIREMENTS.html for more
information about these rules.
Student Behavior
Student behavior that disrupts my ability to teach or other students’ power to learn is supposed to be addressed
according to University of Minnesota policy. To learn more, go to
http://www1.umn.edu/regents/policies/academic/Student_Conduct_Code.html
Language Lab Schedule: TBD
Email and Moodle
Communication from me personally about th is class takes place through e-mail to your UMN email account, which is
accessible at http://mail.umn.edu. You are accountable for checking your e-mail account frequently. We will
also make use of Moodle, an online program administration system. To get into this class’s Moodle website, go to
https://moodle.umn.edu and click on “Login” inside upper right part of this screen. Next, enter your x500
(email) ID plus password. Then click o n the title of this program.
Electronic Devices
The use of gadgets in class is forbidden if you do not have first expected me for permission to utilize them.
I will sometimes give you authorization to use your phones or other devices to appear up words or other
information.
Special Needs
If you have special requirements that affect your course performance, particularly a medical condition or trouble seeing,
hearing, or reading inside very first language, please inform me. I will make this course accessible to yo u.
Additional Resources
Some options for extra help consist of:
● Visiting me inside my office hours (Wed. 10:10 -11:30 am) or at another arranged time
● Contacting me via age -mail with specific questions
● Joining the TandemPlus system ( http://languagecenter.cla.umn.edu/tandem ).
● Use Student Writing help (see below).
● Asking me personally for additional exercises to a target a location you want to improve
I wish everybody to pass through this clas s and achieve their objectives, therefore don’t forget to ask for assistance!
Writing Resources
Student composing Support (SWS) provides free writing instruction for all University of Minnesota pupils —
graduate and undergraduate — anyway phases of the writing procedure. In face -to-face and online collaborative
consultations, SWS specialists assist pupils develop effective writing practices and revision strategies. SWS
consultants are instructors of writing: graduate and undergraduate training assistants and professional staff.
Some consultants specialize in using non -native speakers, and others have experience with composing in
specific procedures. Asking can be acquired by appointment through SWS.online and in 15 Nicholson Hall,
and on a walk -in foundation in 9 Appleby Hall. To learn more, visit http://writing.umn.edu/sws or phone 612 —
625 -1893 .
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
67
In addition, SWS offers a number of web -based resources on subjects including documenting sources, planning
and finishing a writing task, and addressing punctuation and grammar concerns. See
http://writing.umn.edu/sws/quickhelp/index.html
Tentative Course Schedule
Please note:
● The outline b elow is tentative and may even be revised.
● Extra projects could be put into enhance students’ understanding, and due dates may be
changed to adjust to the rate of students’ learning.
● Smaller, day-to-day homework assignments aren't placed in this outline
Week Tuesday -Day 1 Thursday -Day 2
1 -Introduce Course
-Introduce Genre
-Critical Genre review: Learn about and
analyze texts for purpose, social energy, and
social context s in set, group, and whole class
work.
2 -Introduce the Graphic Novel (major un it
one)
-Explore Graphic Novels and their
features
-Assign pupils a Graphic Novel
Bibliography for further text exploration
-Critical Genre Analysis: understand and
analyze texts for purpose, social energy, and
social context s in pair, group, and entire class
work.
-Explore graphic novels and their features further
in pairs and also as a whole class.
3 -Finish 1/3 of Boxers and Saints for
today
-Discuss novels with Literature Circle
groups so when a class
-Continue to discuss features of the
graphic novel
-Critical Genre research: find out about and
Analyze Texts for Organization and Flow in pairs
and in general class
4 -Finish 2/3 of Boxers and Saints for
Today
-Discuss novels with Literature Circle
groups and as a complete class
-Continue to talk about options that come with the
graphic novel
-Critical Genre Analysis: understand and
Analyze Texts for Organization and Flow in pairs
and all together class
5 -Finish Boxers and Saints for Today
-Discuss novels with Literature Circle
groups so that as a complete class
-Continue to discuss options that come with the
graphic novel
-Assign Essay 1: Graphic Novel just how to
-Critical Genre research: find out about and
Analyze Logos/Pathos/Ethos in texts in pairs and
all together class
-Begin to learn APA citation format.
-Briefly introduce a considerable ways Gone narrative
GENRE REVIEW COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
68
Book
6 -Critical Genre research: Learn about
and evaluate Logos/Pathos/Ethos in texts
in pairs and also as a complete class
-Continue to understand and exercise APA
citation format
-Do In Class Peer Review 1 -Essay 1 —
Graphic Novel just how to Book
-Finish first se lected reading of a lengthy Way
Gone narrative for today (major device 2)
-Discuss novel area with Literature Circle
Groups so when an entire class
-Discuss top features of a narrative
-Do In Class Peer Review 2 -Essay 1 -Graphic
Novel How to Book
7 -Finish 2nd selected reading of A
Long Method Gone narrative for today
-Discuss novel section with Literature
Circle Groups and also as a whole class
-Continue to go over features of a
narrative
-Essay 1: Graphic Novel how exactly to Book
due
-Critical Genre Analysis: Learn about and discuss
Genre Specific Vocab in pairs so that as a whole
class
8 -Finish 3rd chosen reading of A Long
Way Gone Narrative for today
--Discuss novel section with Literature
Circle Groups so that as an entire class
-Continue to talk about features of a
narrative
-Assign Essay 2 -Writing a Narrative
-Give pupils work time on Essay 2 -Writing a
Narrative
9 -Do Peer Review 1 -Essay 2 -Writing a
Narrative
-Critical Genre Analysis: Puttin’ it All
Together -Analyze genres for all
discourse analysis features learned in
class
-Do Peer Review 2 -Essay 2 -Writing a Narrative
-Discuss class reading on Description of a
Process (major product 3)
-Discuss options that come with Description of a Process
writing
10 -Students will brainstorm 2 -3
Description of a procedure topics
-Brainstorm process steps and then
discuss with partner
-Continue to discuss features of
Description of a procedure writing
-Essay 2 -Writing a Narrative due
-Create/Brainstorm images linked to Description
of a procedure subject steps from Tuesday
-Students wi ll choose one image and practice
writing prose actions to complement image
11 -Students will determine their subject for
writing a Description of an activity paper.
-Work on phrase structures for
Description of a Process
-Critical Genre review: Puttin’ all of it Together —
Continue to apply analyzing genres for all
discourse analysis features learned in class
-Give students work time on Essay 3 -Description
GENRE ANALYSIS COURSE DESIGN: GRAPHIC NOVELS AND BEYO ND
69
-Assign Essay 3 -Description of a Process of a Process
12 -Do Peer Review 1 -Essay 3 -Description
of a Proce ss
-Review citation before Unit 4
-Discuss and analyze features of an Argument
Rationale genre (major device 4)
-Do Peer Review 2 -Essay 3 -Description of a
Process
13 -Brainstorm and practice writing an
argument rationale for just one of the
students’ Descripti on of a Process
writings
-Review Logos/Pathos/Ethos
-Essay 3 -Description of a Process due
-Review Graphic novel and narrative prose novel
-Brainstorm Rationales for a character from
students’ visual novel or narrative novel
-Assign essay 4 -Argument Rationale
14 -Give pupils work time on Essay 4 —
Argument Rationale
-Do Peer Review 1 -Essay 4 -Argument Rationale
-Critical Genre research: last Puttin’ it All
Together -Continue to rehearse analyzing genres
for all discourse analysis features learned in c lass
15 -Peer Review 2 -Essay 4 -Argument
Rationale
-Give students work time on essay as
this is a busy time of the year
-Essay 4 -Argument Rationale due
-In class Reflection
-Last day of course party!!!

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