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A rgumentative Paper Format
*Please observe that this is certainly only an example format. You will find numerous how to organize an
argumentative paper
 INTRODUCTION
o 1-2 paragraphs tops
o PURPOSE: to create and state one’s claim
o OPTIONAL ELEMENTS
 Make your introductory para graph interesting. How will you draw
your visitors in?
 Exactly what history information, if any, do we have to know in order
to understand your claim? If you don’t follow this paragraph with a
background information paragraph, please insert that information right here.
o NEEDED ELEMENTS
 If you’re arguing about a literary work — state writer + title
 If you’re arguing about a concern or theory – give brief explanation
or your of issue/theory.
 If you’re arguing about a film — state manager, 12 months + title
 STATE your claim at the conclusion of one's introductory paragraph
 BACKGROUND PARAGRAPH
o 1-2 paragraphs tops; Optional (can omit for many papers). Also, sometimes
this info is incorporated into the introduction paragraph (see above).
o PURPOSE: Lays the inspiration for demonstrating your ar gument.
o Will most likely consist of:
 Overview of works being discussed
 Definition of search terms
 Explanation of key theories
 SUPPORTING EVIDENCE PARAGRAPH #1
o PURPOSE: to show your argument. Frequently is one paragraph but it can be
longer.
o Topic Sentence: What is o ne item, fact, information, or instance you are able to tell your
readers that will help them better realize your claim/paper topic? Your
answer ought to be the subject sentence because of this paragraph.
o Explain Topic Sentence: Do you need to explain your topic sentence? I f therefore,
do therefore right here.
o Introduce proof: Introduce your proof either in a few words (As Dr.
Brown states ―…‖) or in a full sentence (―To understand why issue we firs t
need to look at statistics).
o State Evidence: just what supporting proof (reasons, exa mples, facts,
statistics, and/or quotations) are you able to add to prove/support/explain your
topic sentence?
o Explain Evidence: exactly how should we read or interpret evidence you are
providing united states? How exactly does this proof prove the idea you're attempting to make
in this paragraph? Can be opinion based and it is usually about 1 -3 sentences.
o Concluding Sentence: End your paragraph with a concluding sentence that
reasserts how the topic sentence with this paragraph helps up better
understand and/or show your paper’s ov erall claim.
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 SUPPORTING EVIDENCE PARAGRAPH #2, 3, 4 etc.
o Repeat above
 COUNTERARGUMENT PARAGRAPH
o PURPOSE: To anticipate your reader’s objections; make your self sound more
objective and reasonable.
o Optional; usually 1 -2 paragraphs tops
o exactly what feasible argument might your reader pose against your argument
and/or some aspect of your thinking? Insert one or more of those
arguments right here and refute them.
o End paragraph with a concluding sentence that reasserts your paper’s claim
all together.
 CONCLUSION ROLE 1: SUMMARIZE PARAGRAPH
o PURPOSE: Remind visitors of the argument and supporting evidence
o Summary you're most likely taught to publish in High School
o Restates your paper’s general claim and supporting evidence
 CONCLUSION ROLE 2: THE “SO WHAT” PARAGRA PH
o PURPOSE: To illustrate towards trainer that you have actually thought critically
and analytically about this problem.
o Your summary cannot simply restate your intro paragraph. If your
conclusion states nearly the same thing as your introduction, i t may
indicate that you haven't done enough critical reasoning during the program of
your essay (because you finished up right in which you began).
o Your summary should inform us why we ought to worry about your paper. What is
the importance of your claim? Wh y can it be important to you as the writer or to
me while the audience? What information if you or I take away from this?
o Your summary should produce a sense of movement to a more complex
understanding associated with the subject of one's paper. By the finish of your essay, you
should been employed by through your tips sufficient which means that your reader
understands everything have argued and is prepared to hear the larger point (in other words.
the «so what») you intend to make about your topic.
o Your summary should serve as the climax of your pape r. Therefore, save your self your
strongest analytical points for the end of your essay, and make use of them to drive
your conclusion
o Vivid, tangible language is as crucial in a conclusion because it is elsewhere —
perhaps more essential, considering that the conclusion determines your reader' s final
impression of one's essay. Usually do not keep them with the impression that your
argument had been vague or not sure.
o WARNING: It is fine to introduce new information or quotations in your
conclusions, as long as the brand new points develop from your argument. Brand new p oints
might be more general, answering the «so what» question; they might be
quite certain. Simply avoid making brand new claims that need a lot of additional
support.
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OUTLINE WORKSHOP
INTRODUCTION
BACKGROUND
SUPPORTING EVIDENCE #1
SUPPORTING EV IDENCE #2
SUPPORTING EVIDENCE #3
COUNTERARGUMENT
SUM UP CONCLUSION
 summarize claim + supporting proof statements
SO WHAT SUMMARY

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